Land Trust – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 12:25:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nflandtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-138x136.png Land Trust – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ 32 32 Ventura Land Trust Presents Outdoor Paint Shop at Harmon Canyon Preserve https://nflandtrust.org/ventura-land-trust-presents-outdoor-paint-shop-at-harmon-canyon-preserve/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 12:25:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/ventura-land-trust-presents-outdoor-paint-shop-at-harmon-canyon-preserve/ Ventura Land Trust expands its public program offerings with an artist-led outdoor painting workshop at 8 a.m. on July 9 at Harmon Canyon Preserve. Artists Debra Holladay, Laura Wambsgans, and Marian Fortunati will offer instruction to new and experienced artists on how to capture Harmon Canyon’s natural landscape through composition, form, color, and paint manipulation. […]]]>

Ventura Land Trust expands its public program offerings with an artist-led outdoor painting workshop at 8 a.m. on July 9 at Harmon Canyon Preserve.

Artists Debra Holladay, Laura Wambsgans, and Marian Fortunati will offer instruction to new and experienced artists on how to capture Harmon Canyon’s natural landscape through composition, form, color, and paint manipulation.

Participants will receive group and one-on-one instruction. The group discussion will allow painters to learn from each other. Ventura Land Trust staff will join the workshop to share elements of the natural and cultural history of Harmon Canyon Preserve.

Painting in the open air, the French expression for “en plein air”, is the act of leaving the walls of a studio and painting in the open air. Artists explore how to paint form and light, with its changing and ephemeral qualities, with portable paints and easels.

“Painting en plein air allows me to focus and interact in real time to understand and learn about a place,” said workshop facilitator Debra Holladay. “The experience of light, color, sound, smell, temperature and touch magnifies and records my experience through painting.”

“One of the most rewarding aspects of working outdoors is seeing things you’ve never noticed before, like the color of dry grass or a fleeting edge of neon where light bends or reflects . I hope to share this aspect of vision and how to translate it into paint with workshop participants, in addition to a basic approach to turning a blank canvas into a paint.

The workshop is $20 for members of the Ventura Land Trust and $30 for non-members. Attendees can view the complete list of suggested painting supplies and register for the workshop at www.venturalandtrust.org/pleinair.

The mission of Ventura Land Trust is to permanently protect the land, water, wildlife and scenic beauty of the Ventura region for present and future generations. The organization currently owns and manages land along the Ventura River and in the Ventura Hills, including the 2,100-acre Harmon Canyon Preserve. All preserves are open to the public daily from dawn to dusk free of charge. Ventura Land Trust is an accredited member of the Land Trust Alliance.

A lifelong painter and Californian, Ms. Holladay’s artistic career began at the age of two with a tube of red lipstick and her cooperative dog, followed by a pencil mural unsuccessfully hidden behind dresser. Working both in the studio and in the field, Ms. Holladay rewards the viewer with small details often overlooked by the casual observer in her paintings.

She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Central Oklahoma, followed by six years of study at the Art Students League of New York. Artist member of the California Art Club, she is co-founder of Studio2310 and founding member of the PAC6 Painters.

Originally from California, Ms. Wambsgans began landscape oil painting 16 years ago, after working as the general manager of a major recording studio and then as a sculptor for two decades. Studying intensely with Scott Christensen and other respected landscape painters and painting daily, Ms. Wambsgans strives to capture the effect of light on earth, through color and quality of paint.

In 2006, the artist directed “Chasing Open Spaces”, an environmental project painting the open spaces of the Santa Clarita Valley. The exposures generated by this project have contributed to the preservation of the Elsmere Canyon in Santa Clarita. Ms. Wambsgans has been an active member of the California Art Club since 2002 and a founding member of the PAC6 Painters.

Award-winning artist Ms. Fortunati is a contemporary California Impressionist who uses oil paints to create interesting experiments with texture and color. She is originally from Southern California and has enjoyed a long career as a teacher and principal in Los Angeles. After painting and studying art for many years outside of work, she now paints full time.

Ms. Fortunati laid a foundation in the Impressionist tradition of seeing and painting forms of light and color through the instruction of artists Ray Roberts, Frank Gardner, Matt Smith, Daniel Pinkham and master landscape and underwater artist David C. Gallup.

An artist member of the California Art Club and a founding member of PAC6 Painters, she maintains affiliations with the American Impressionist Society, Oil Painters of America, and various other art organizations.

email: mmcmahon@newspress.com

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

For more information, visit www.venturalandtrust.org.

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Oregon butterflies and their host plants | Natural World | Fold | The Weekly Source https://nflandtrust.org/oregon-butterflies-and-their-host-plants-natural-world-fold-the-weekly-source/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:05:39 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/oregon-butterflies-and-their-host-plants-natural-world-fold-the-weekly-source/ Bbutterflies fluttering in the forest, prairie, or your backyard are a sure sign of summer in central Oregon. Warmer weather and blooming flowers bring out a wide variety of these amazing and delicate creatures, making them easy to spot and observe. It’s the bright colors that grab the attention of many people, but did you […]]]>

Bbutterflies fluttering in the forest, prairie, or your backyard are a sure sign of summer in central Oregon. Warmer weather and blooming flowers bring out a wide variety of these amazing and delicate creatures, making them easy to spot and observe. It’s the bright colors that grab the attention of many people, but did you know that all butterflies are also deeply connected to the earth around them? They depend on native plants as hosts to lay their eggs, to provide the food young caterpillars need to survive, and as sources of nectar to sip on the liquid ingredients they need to feed themselves. One of the best-known examples is, of course, the monarch butterfly, which depends on milkweed as the sole host plant for the caterpillar’s egg-laying and leaf-munching. This complex relationship between butterfly and plant lends to the wonder of nature and also offers a clue as to where to look to find and identify the butterfly. Here are five butterflies to watch out for that are common in early summer, along with their host plants and nectar sources:

California tortoiseshell, Nymphalis californica. This medium-sized butterfly (~2.5 inches) is bright orange with black wing margins and black spots. They are very common in central Oregon and are often seen in late winter or early spring as they overwinter as adults, often hiding in crevices and other sheltered places. Tortoiseshell depends on the snow brush (Ceanothus velutinus) as host plants. This large shrub is a common understory plant in our pine forests which, when it blooms, is covered with masses of white flowers. The tortoiseshells will lay their eggs in clusters on the snow brush, then the caterpillars will eat the leaves once they emerge. The snowbrush is a source of nectar for these butterflies, but they will also drink other flowers, sap, and even dripping fir needles in the spring! Tortoiseshells can be seen in flight from spring through fall, and even on warm winter days.Pale Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio eurymedon. This strikingly large butterfly (3+ inches) has pale white to cream wings with black vitreous markings and bright orange and blue markings near its two long, slender tails. Like the California tortoiseshell, pallid swallowtails use snowbrush as a host plant, but they will also use the ocean and serviceberry. Saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia) is a superb native shrub that is covered in white flowers each spring. You’ll find it (along with the Pale Swallowtail!) throughout central Oregon as an understory plant in our pine forests and along our streams and rivers. Sources of pale swallowtail nectar include chokecherry, mints, lilies, and penstemons. Look out for these beautiful butterflies that fly most often in early summer.

Click to enlarge

  • Courtesy of Deschutes Land Trust
  • A California tortoiseshell butterfly rests on a flower during the summer in Skyline Forest.

Western Bluetail, Amyntula of Cupid. There are many different species of little blue butterflies in central Oregon. In order to tell the difference between them, you usually need to see the underside of their wings, which can be a bit tricky given their small size and constant movement. The western tailed blue is an average size for a blue (~1.25 inches), and it is one of the easiest blues to identify due to the tiny “tails” protruding from its hind wings ( hence its name). These winged gems depend on a variety of plants in the pea family (like astragalus and golden pea) for egg laying, and will produce nectar from them, along with other wildflowers, bunny brush, and more. Look for the Western Tailed-blue in damp spots along our local trails where it frequently “puddles”, sipping salts and minerals from the moist soil.

Click to enlarge
Western tailed blue butterfly.  - COURTESY OF DESCHUTES LAND TRUST

  • Courtesy of Deschutes Land Trust
  • Western tailed blue butterfly.




Pale Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio eurymedon.
This strikingly large butterfly (3+ inches) has pale white to cream wings with black vitreous markings and bright orange and blue markings near its two long, slender tails. Like the California tortoiseshell, pallid swallowtails use snowbrush as a host plant, but they will also use the ocean and serviceberry. Saskatoon (Amelanchier alnifolia) is a superb native shrub that is covered in white flowers each spring. You’ll find it (along with the Pale Swallowtail!) throughout central Oregon as an understory plant in our pine forests and along our streams and rivers. Sources of pale swallowtail nectar include chokecherry, mints, lilies, and penstemons. Look out for these beautiful butterflies that fly most often in early summer.

Click to enlarge
Pale Tiger Swallowtail butterfly in flight.  - COURTESY OF DESCHUTES LAND TRUST

  • Courtesy of Deschutes Land Trust
  • Pale Tiger Swallowtail butterfly in flight.


Admiral de Lorquin,
Lorquine Limenite. One of our most beautiful butterflies, the Lorquin never fails to attract attention! It is one of our largest local butterflies (~3 inches) and is vividly colored: jet black barred with bright white diagonal stripes, orange wingtips above and brick red and white below. Its host plant is usually willow, but also aspen, cottonwood, serviceberry, ocean and others. Willow is one of our most common shrubs, and it is found in a wide variety of habitats, including along our streams and rivers. Admirals of Lorquin are often seen perched on the bark of the Pacific, sipping fake orange, or visiting mustards, yarrows, thistles, dogbane and the like to refuel.

Click to enlarge
Lorquin's Admiral Butterfly lands on an orange scythe at Whychus Canyon Preserve.  - COURTESY OF DESCHUTES LAND TRUST

  • Courtesy of Deschutes Land Trust
  • Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly lands on an orange scythe at Whychus Canyon Preserve.

Two Stripe Plaid Skipper, Rural pyrgus. Skippers are another family of butterflies that have more robust and compact bodies, faster wing beats for taking flight, and hooked tips on their antennae. The two-banded checkered skipper has dark wings with white “checkerboard” patterns and ranges in size from 1 to 1.5 inches. They are common in late spring and early summer, often feeding on dandelions, strawberries, and other early flowers. Mallows are a favored host plant, as are potentillas and strawberries. You can spot these skippers in a wide variety of habitats, from woods and grasslands to pastures and backyards.

Click to enlarge
A two stripe checkered skipper rests on one hand at the Metolius Preserve.  - COURTESY OF DESCHUTES LAND TRUST

  • Courtesy of Deschutes Land Trust
  • A two stripe checkered skipper rests on one hand at the Metolius Preserve.

Wondering where to find butterflies to observe? Head to Deschutes Land Trust’s Metolius Preserve where you can see all of these species. Park at the north trailhead and hike the Larch Loop for the best viewing opportunities. And always remember that butterflies are fragile creatures. They have delicate scales on their wings that can fall off when touched, so they are best viewed from a distance using binoculars. Happy butterfly!

Sarah Mowry is Director of Outreach for Deschutes Land Trust. Amanda Egertson is the organization’s stewardship director.

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Legacy Project Honors Letitia Carson, Oregon’s Only Black Homeowner https://nflandtrust.org/legacy-project-honors-letitia-carson-oregons-only-black-homeowner/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:01:56 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/legacy-project-honors-letitia-carson-oregons-only-black-homeowner/ Oregon State University, Oregon Black Land Trust, Oregon Black Pioneers, and the Linn-Benton NAACP chapter have begun preserving and sharing the story of Letitia Carson, the only black woman in the state to claim a farm under the Homestead Act of 1862 and won two lawsuits. against a white neighbor who sold her property. During […]]]>

Oregon State University, Oregon Black Land Trust, Oregon Black Pioneers, and the Linn-Benton NAACP chapter have begun preserving and sharing the story of Letitia Carson, the only black woman in the state to claim a farm under the Homestead Act of 1862 and won two lawsuits. against a white neighbor who sold her property.

During the June 19 weekend celebration, volunteers worked on the former Carson Project as part of an archaeological exploration alongside OSU archeology students or alumni to excavate the ground.

The dig and open house was the first opportunity for the public to gather on the grounds and reflect on their lives while standing in the space Carson once called home, said Zachary Stocks, executive director of Oregon Black Pioneers.

The hope is to eventually do more field programming, Stocks said.

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Areas affected by the 2020 Labor Day fires will receive 625 affordable housing units https://nflandtrust.org/areas-affected-by-the-2020-labor-day-fires-will-receive-625-affordable-housing-units/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:09:54 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/areas-affected-by-the-2020-labor-day-fires-will-receive-625-affordable-housing-units/ Grants announced this month will bring affordable homes and apartments to Oregon communities devastated by wildfires in 2020. A deer sculpture remains in front of a heat-warped vinyl fence and the remains of a house in Gates in 2020. (Ron Cooper/Salem Reporter) Oregon counties devastated by the 2020 Labor Day fires will receive 625 new […]]]>

Grants announced this month will bring affordable homes and apartments to Oregon communities devastated by wildfires in 2020.

A deer sculpture remains in front of a heat-warped vinyl fence and the remains of a house in Gates in 2020. (Ron Cooper/Salem Reporter)

Oregon counties devastated by the 2020 Labor Day fires will receive 625 new affordable homes thanks to more than $73 million from the state’s Housing Stability Council.

These wildfires have burned over a million acres and destroyed more than 4,000 homes. More than 1,700 of these were manufactured homes, one of the few affordable options for families.

The $73 million in grants announced this month is just a portion of more than $422 million the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development has allocated to Oregon for wildfire recovery. Most of the new homes will be limited income rental properties in Jackson, Marion, Clackamas and Lincoln counties.

In Jackson County, where the Almeda Fire destroyed the Talent Mobile Estates manufactured home park and displaced nearly 90 families, a nonprofit will receive $7.5 million to purchase the land and begin building convert it into a resident-owned co-op.

Medford will get 84 new homes, half of which will be sold to families earning 80% or less of the median income, which in Jackson County is $81,400. Medford will also be home to more than 230 new income-restricted rental apartments, intended to house farm workers displaced by the fires, and 22 income-restricted cottages for seniors.

A Salem apartment project, Gateway, will receive $25 million to build 129 apartments that can only be rented by people with household incomes below 60% of the region’s median, which in Salem is $89,100.

Marion County will also receive $2.8 million to build 24 homes outside the Salem city limits but inside the city’s urban growth limits, a line that dictates where cities can expand. . These homes will be for sale to people earning up to 80% of median income, but the land the homes are on will be owned by a community land trust.

The county government will also receive $1.7 million to purchase 15 acres of land in Mill City to use for future affordable housing.

“Currently, we have approximately 300 households in Marion County that do not have a place to call home,” Marion County Commissioner Danielle Bethell said in a statement. “This $1.7 million will not just be used to buy land; it will give us the opportunity to create long-term affordable housing that works for this community that has been devastated by the wildfires.

A Lincoln City nonprofit will receive nearly $4 million to build 44 low-income apartments for people displaced by wildfires that burned mobile home parks in the northern part of Lincoln County. In Clackamas County, nearly $10 million will go to 36 apartments in the rural community of Estacada.

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I learned a lesson the hard way – The Tryon Daily Bulletin https://nflandtrust.org/i-learned-a-lesson-the-hard-way-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 16:06:28 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/i-learned-a-lesson-the-hard-way-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ “It’s a good thing to learn to be suspicious of the misfortunes of others.” ~ Publilius Syrus (85–43 BC) Once in a while I just have to write a column about “don’t do what I did”. Consider it sage advice, dear reader. Trust me ! My cautionary tale for today involves me being denser than […]]]>

“It’s a good thing to learn to be suspicious of the misfortunes of others.” ~ Publilius Syrus (85–43 BC)

Once in a while I just have to write a column about “don’t do what I did”. Consider it sage advice, dear reader. Trust me !

My cautionary tale for today involves me being denser than a soaked loaf of bread – I trusted a company to securely store my credit card number for convenience.

A certain well-known restaurant/bread chain, which we won’t name, makes bread which has been a lifelong addiction of mine, especially when I was too lazy to make my own. With their app on my phone, I could receive my order quickly – paid for, packed, ready to go by sunset (or in a jar of strawberry jam and butter).

Long story short, my account was hacked. Some Bronx thugs placed three orders, including a year’s coffee subscription. I started getting notifications that I had ordered all of this, and it would be ready soon. Eh? Then my bank sent out alerts, checking if it was me who led him to call his fraud department.

Now I’m stuck waiting for a new card/number (which is a royal pain, folks). The app has been deleted from my phone. And I’m still annoyed by that coffee subscription, not to mention the dinner parties the hacker enjoyed at my expense.

This lesson was learned the hard way. It could have been worse. Hackers won’t get far into my bank account, that’s for sure, but it’s cringe. May they have heartburn for a very long time.

The Saluda Tailgate Market is Fridays in the West City parking lot off Main Street from 4:30-6:00 p.m.

Saluda Community Land Trust (SCLT) is active in land conservation, trails, projects and more: visit saludaclt.org or call 828-749-1560 for more information. Support SCLT with donations, volunteering and Amazon Smile. Contact “Trail Boss” Chuck Hearon at cheron1942@gmail.com about leading a hike or helping clear trails. The next walk in the woods will be June 19 at Green River Cove/Old Cove Road. Meet at the Saluda Library parking lot at 2 p.m.

The Saluda Library offers summer storytime sessions for ages 2 to 5 on Tuesdays from 10:30 a.m. to August 3. Books, songs and fun activities for the little ones!

Through the partnership of SCLT and the Polk County Community Foundation, free swim lessons are once again available in Twin Lakes this summer (June 20-July 22) for Polk County residents and those who live in the ZIP code. by Saluda. Instructor Brian Lilburn, who has over 20 years of experience teaching swimming, schedules one-to-one 15-20 minute lessons daily (Monday-Friday) between 9am and 5pm. Children can start lessons from the age of 12 months. To register or get information, call the SCLT office or email twinlakesswim@gmail.com

The Top of the Grade Summer Concert Series returns to McCreery Park with Fancy and the Gentlemen on June 24, 7-9 p.m.

Pot luck / bingo night at the Saluda Center on June 27, 6 p.m.

Saluda Presbyterian Church is planning a ‘thank you celebration’ July 2 at 11:30 a.m. on the lawn with food, fun and fellowship to highlight what donations and hard work can do to help restore a small historical treasure of Saluda.

The 58th annual Coon Dog Day will take place on July 9, from noon to 9:30 p.m. Don’t miss it!

On Coon Dog Day, the Saluda 5K will be a project/fundraiser for Saluda Elementary School. The 3.1-mile race begins on Main Street at 8 a.m. and follows the traditional Coon Dog Day 5K course: https://runsignup.com/Race/NC/Saluda/CoonDogDayRace. If you would like to volunteer, contact Gina at gburnett@polkschools.org.

The Saluda Visitor Center at 20 Main Street is open daily from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; as well as the first Friday walks from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. If you are interested in volunteering or learning more about the Welcome Center, contact Lynn Casey at caseysaluda@gmail.com.

Congratulations to all recent graduates!

Happy Birthday June to Nancy Barnett, Verne Dawson, Peggy Ellwood, Anna Jackson, Charlie Jackson, Amy Violet Ford, Terry Arrington, Julie Arrington, Susie Welsh Hearn, Jeremy Edwards, Eleanor Morgan, Mary Lu Price, Sigi Hendrickson, Edna McKee, Lucinda Pittman, DJ Gaskin, Susan Matthews, Lisa Duck, Kasey Watkins, Elena Robson, Karen McGee, Jane Mann and Chambli Dawn Stuber.

Do not hesitate to contact me at bbardos@gmail.com(828) 817-6765, PO Box 331, Saluda, NC 28773, Facebook, or visit bonniebardos.com

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Topsail Island Beach is part of the NC Civil Rights Trail https://nflandtrust.org/topsail-island-beach-is-part-of-the-nc-civil-rights-trail/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:08:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/topsail-island-beach-is-part-of-the-nc-civil-rights-trail/ In the 1950s, Carla Torrey spent her childhood summers watching her father build homes on Topsail Island and other structures like the Wade Chestnut Memorial Chapel, which still stands today. Memories also include watching the waves hit the shore, while looking right and left, and seeing large crowds of white people during the days of […]]]>

In the 1950s, Carla Torrey spent her childhood summers watching her father build homes on Topsail Island and other structures like the Wade Chestnut Memorial Chapel, which still stands today.

Memories also include watching the waves hit the shore, while looking right and left, and seeing large crowds of white people during the days of segregation.

“There was seriously an invisible line that separated us,” Torrey said.

At that time, the stretch of the island was known as OceanCity, a place where black people could enjoy the beach without harassment. It was established as a vacation haven in the late 1940s for black people and the only place they could buy beachfront property.

Members of the Ocean City community attend St. Mark’s Episcopal Chapel Church, now known as the Wade H Chestnut Memorial Chapel in North Topsail Beach.

Today, Torrey works with other community members to preserve the historic legacy as president of the Ocean City Beach Citizens Council.

“They didn’t make it a place where black people could just go and dance and have fun,” Torrey said. “They made it a community.”

In July, Ocean City will be honored with a historical marker from the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources and the North Carolina African American Heritage Commission. The sign will be part of the state civil rights trail. Torrey submitted the request for recognition of the marker. They were aided by the City of North Topsail Beach, the Topsail Island Historical Society and others.

Kenneth Chestnut Sr. said the historical marker is very important, before mentioning other ways to preserve history.

“I believe that we need to be aware of our history and know our history, and that will help people get to know the Ocean City community better,” he said. “It will be a big boost for us and broaden the recognition of the Ocean City community.”

His parents, Wade H Chestnut and Caronell Chestnut, were the first owners. The family home was built in 1949 and was rebuilt in 1955 after being destroyed by Hurricane Hazel. Chestnut’s father, Wade Chestnut, managed the fishing pier and led the development of Ocean City.

“I have fond memories of being at the beach in the summer and fall on weekends,” Chestnut said of Wilmington getaways. “Part of that was playing in the water and sand and having fun with my friends and fishing.”

He also worked at the pier, doing chores and selling snow cones. Chestnut said he always felt safe in the beach community where families shared seafood dishes. To prepare meals, women went crabbing and their sons helped carry the baskets.

“Everyone enjoyed each other’s company, and it was always a safe, family-oriented community,” he said.

Like Torrey, Chestnut remembers those times when the beach was divided into parts based on skin color.

“It was the way of the world,” he said. “I grew up in the Jim Crow South, and especially here in Wilmington.”
Although there were racial tensions, Chestnut said there were some positive things he saw in his youth. One was that everyone fished together at the pier when the fish were biting. The pier was a commercial enterprise run by blacks, but whites participated as shareholders.

“They had a common interest that brought them together, regardless of race at the time,” he said. “Granted Ocean City was in the middle of white communities on either side, but we enjoyed the beach and enjoyed the families.”

Torrey now lives in Durham, but she still visits her family’s beach house when she wants to get away from the big city.

She hopes the marker is an encouragement for future generations.

“I want future generations to understand the resilience of the African American community and how they were able to do something that was not acceptable in many places,” she said. “In fact most of the beaches weren’t allowed to us or were sunset towns so we couldn’t be in the area after dark. It was quite an achievement.

She also highlighted the historic significance of the founding of Ocean City in 1949, 51 years after the Wilmington massacre of 1898, where many black people were killed and fled the city in a coup. led by a white supremacist mob, which overthrew a biracial government.

The idea for a black-owned beach community came from Edgar L Yow, a white attorney from Wilmington. He owned land on Topsail Island and shared his thoughts with Dr. Samuel Gray, a black doctor. Topsail Island was previously used as a shooting range during World War II for soldiers from Camp Davis. It then reopened for development. Gray contacted his friends, the Chestnut family, who purchased tracts of land on the island. Chestnut’s father was one of Gray’s buddies.

After the first homes were built on a one-mile stretch for Ocean City, other homes and businesses followed. A motel and restaurant were built in 1953, in addition to other facilities, such as summer camp dormitories connected to the church, a dining hall, and the Ocean City fishing pier.

There are small logos on the street signs letting visitors know they are in the historic district, but community members would love to see more.

“As for having a sign that says you’re entering Ocean City, it’s not there,” Chestnut said. “It’s one of the projects we’re working on.”

But in the meantime, the community eagerly awaits the unveiling of the historic marker at the 2022 Ocean City Jazz Festival. Each year the festival is held in North Topsail Beach to promote and celebrate the history of the community while raising funds for future projects.

In addition to the festival, community members are working to establish a land trust and fundraising campaign to raise money for needs such as lawyers and other legal matters.

“I call it bold for people like me to build community at the beach, and after Hurricane Hazel in the 1950s, they could have stopped and said ‘OK, we tried.’ But they had the tenacity to rebuild.”

Kenneth Chestnut Sr.

After Hurricane Fran in 1996 much of the community was lost along with the pier, motel and many homes after the lots became unbuildable. There are nearly 60 homes in the community that are still black-owned. Before Fran, there were over 100.

Chestnut is happy that the people of Ocean City’s landowner generation were able to pass on their property to continue their legacy.

But it’s always a challenge.

“But because of integration or people having choices, the next generation is living in other places, so they may not think Ocean City’s legacy and legacy is that important,” a- he declared. “Very often the property can be sold to a builder or developer who can lease or lease it.”

Another threat is the loss of a quiet, low-density family community he knew years ago as development continues on Topsail Island due to the real estate market, unconnected to the community. Mother Nature, hurricane intensity, sea level rise and erosion are also issues of concern.

These are issues the community is keeping tabs on. But a third essential mission is to publicize Ocean City through events like the jazz festival.

“I call it daring for people like me to build a community at the beach, and after Hurricane Hazel in the 1950s, they could have stopped and said ‘OK, we tried,'” said Chestnut said of the destructive storm. “But they had the tenacity to rebuild. So, I see people like me (and others) as stewards of what our families have committed to do for us. We are the stewards of what they passed on to us. So we want to make sure we’re the best stewards we can be.

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Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund Grant Local Land Funds to Save Land in Northwest Arkansas | Advertisement https://nflandtrust.org/bass-pro-shops-and-cabelas-outdoor-fund-grant-local-land-funds-to-save-land-in-northwest-arkansas-advertisement/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 22:57:10 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/bass-pro-shops-and-cabelas-outdoor-fund-grant-local-land-funds-to-save-land-in-northwest-arkansas-advertisement/ Press release Northwest Arkansas Land Trust Receives Grant to Conserve 300 Acres of Ozark Forest JOHNSON COUNTY, AR – The Northwest Arkansas Land Trust (NWALT) announced on Tuesday, June 7, 2022, recent grant funding from Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund to move toward full funding for their initiative to permanently protect 300 acres […]]]>

Press release

Northwest Arkansas Land Trust Receives Grant to Conserve 300 Acres of Ozark Forest

JOHNSON COUNTY, AR – The Northwest Arkansas Land Trust (NWALT) announced on Tuesday, June 7, 2022, recent grant funding from Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund to move toward full funding for their initiative to permanently protect 300 acres of Ozark Forest in southern Washington County, AR, west of the Bobby Hopper Tunnel on Interstate 49.

The area, named Blackburn Bluffs Preserve, is a designated scenic drive at the entrance to the area and is home to over 400 species of plants and animals, including turkey, black bear, white-tailed deer, smallmouth bass, and is an important feeding area. for the northern long-eared bat, a federally endangered species, and the Ozark big-eared bat, a federally endangered species. Its natural beauty attracts thousands of tourists to the area every year. According to Pam Nelson, Director of Land Protection for NWALT, “The region’s population is expected to double between 2020 and 2045, reaching nearly one million. Northwest Arkansas is the fastest growing region in the central United States. On average, the region loses nine acres of open space each day.

Blackburn Bluffs Preserve is adjacent to 725 acres of private land which was permanently protected by a conservation easement in 2019. Together the properties establish a protected corridor for wildlife movement under the elevated highway. Conserving the two properties will protect 2.5 miles of Blackburn Creek, a tributary of the Lee Creek watershed that supplies drinking water to more than 200,000 people in the Fort Smith metropolitan area. The acquisition of Blackburn Bluffs Preserve is part of NWALT’s ongoing strategic effort to establish a scenic Boston Mountain Wildlife Corridor, aimed at connecting the publicly protected lands of Devil’s Den State Park and Boston National Forest. Ozark in the west to the Ozark National Forest in the east.

The Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund grant is part of the company’s initiative to invest in programs consistent with its commitment to conservation. This includes conserving wildlife and habitats, connecting new audiences to the outdoors, advocating for access and sportsman rights, and strengthening communities in the Ozarks of Missouri. “We believe our conservation plan for this area works in perfect alignment with the mission of Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund, as the permanent protection of Blackburn Bluffs Preserve will benefit Fort residents. Smith, Arkansas and those in Benton and Washington counties, the state’s tourism industry, and hunters and anglers,” Nelson said.

In addition to preserving natural resources and wildlife habitat in the Blackburn Bluffs Reserve, NWALT believes conserving this area will also increase access to outdoor recreation and community participation in guided hikes. and outdoor excursions that will result in increased community awareness of the importance of land conservation in the area.

About the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust

The Northwest Arkansas Land Trust is the region’s first local, accredited land trust, dedicated to improving the quality of life through permanent land protection. By holding and managing donated lands and providing conservation easement services, the land trust protects water quality, local farms, wildlife habitats and outdoor recreation areas while improving the quality of lives of present and future generations. The Land Trust‘s service area includes 13 counties in northwest Arkansas, with a particular focus on Benton, Washington, Madison, and Carroll counties. For more information, visit the Land Trust’s website at www.nwalandtrust.org.

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Drew University students help out in Biloxi, Mississippi https://nflandtrust.org/drew-university-students-help-out-in-biloxi-mississippi/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 23:20:06 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/drew-university-students-help-out-in-biloxi-mississippi/ Tags: Civic engagement, CLA, Community service and leadership, students, Theological school Drew University students help out in Biloxi, Mississippi “It was an eye-opening experience” June 2022 – Fourteen students from Drew University traveled to Biloxi, Mississippi and surrounding areas to provide much-needed volunteer aid to the coastal area still ravaged by the effects of Hurricane […]]]>

Tags: Civic engagement, CLA, Community service and leadership, students, Theological school

Drew University students help out in Biloxi, Mississippi

“It was an eye-opening experience”

June 2022 – Fourteen students from Drew University traveled to Biloxi, Mississippi and surrounding areas to provide much-needed volunteer aid to the coastal area still ravaged by the effects of Hurricane Katrina.

Drew’s Volunteering Without Borders, a student-run organization that connects students with service opportunities in local communities to engage in meaningful service journeys, both nationally and internationally, organized the event. The trip was supported by Drew’s Center for Civic Engagement, Drew Hillel and Student Engagement.

Students addressed community needs regarding environmental restoration and hunger.

“Students were able to work and learn from locals who dedicate their time to their community,” said the student leader of the trip and Drew Action Scholar Angel Wunderle C’24. “I think for many students it was an eye-opening experience. Yes, we were there to improve the physical aspects of Biloxi, but we also got to experience and contribute to the community.



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Drew students working at 34th Street Holistic Community Garden





During the seven-day trip, the students planted seeds and vegetables in 34th Street Wholistic Community Garden in Gulfport, Mississippi, which provides access to healthy, affordable food to surrounding communities.

The group also volunteered with the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain to build two brick boardwalks for their on-site nature trail. “Despite constant hurricanes ruining their nature trails and limiting the growth of their vegetables, people are still committed to creating community spaces and working together,” Wunderle said.

“I think what’s had a pretty big impact for the students is being able to engage with the lives and stories of community members who live and battle not only the hurricanes we hear about on the news, but also the storms that bombard their communities and regularly cause great damage. base,” said Gionna Del Purgatorio C’20, Changebuilders Coordinator at Drew’s Center for Civic Engagement, who accompanied the students on the trip.



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Construction of a brick boardwalk at the Land Trust for the Mississippi Coastal Plain





Through daily reflections, students discovered other addressable issues, such as food waste and unequal pay.

“There are a lot of people working really hard to get food to our supermarkets – we don’t really know how our food gets to the table,” said Drew theological school student Labenyimoh Patrick T’23, graduate intern from the Center for Civic Engagement.

“This problem changes our ideas about food and the way we think about food,” he continued. “Hard work doesn’t necessarily mean you get paid a lot. Our society is built on the idea that people who work hard earn more.

“It was also great to see that the students weren’t taking these stories at face value, but thinking critically about how the story plays a part and what voices may be missing in the story,” said Del Purgatorio. “Many of us were previously unaware of the amount of care and maintenance needed for places we take for granted, such as public walking and hiking trails, in areas heavily impacted by storms and flooding. It’s a great example of how solutions to community problems look different in different parts of the country or the world, or even in one’s own community.


DREW UNIVERSITY NEWS

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21 Affordable Woolacombe Homes a Little Closer to Reality https://nflandtrust.org/21-affordable-woolacombe-homes-a-little-closer-to-reality/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 16:07:17 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/21-affordable-woolacombe-homes-a-little-closer-to-reality/ A development of 21 new social rented accommodation in Woolacombe is a step closer to reality thanks to complementary funding from North Devon Council added to the district’s first Community Land Trust (CLT) scheme. At a meeting of the Board’s Strategy and Resources Committee today (Monday June 6), members decided that a total of £630,000 […]]]>

A development of 21 new social rented accommodation in Woolacombe is a step closer to reality thanks to complementary funding from North Devon Council added to the district’s first Community Land Trust (CLT) scheme.

At a meeting of the Board’s Strategy and Resources Committee today (Monday June 6), members decided that a total of £630,000 (£30,000 per unit) would be added to £141,000 per external financing unit to enable the delivery of social housing rent, subject to planning permission. external funding, Homes England and Aster attracted almost £3m in government funding / registered supplier in North Devon.

Mortehoe and Woolacombe CLT is a non-profit organization established in 2020 through the original Community Housing Fund; a government fund set up to increase the supply of housing in England by increasing the number of additional homes delivered by the community-led housing sector.

The new housing site, adjacent to Woolacombe Village Hall, was showcased to the community and received tremendous community support. Thanks to a partnership between the community, the Community Land Trust, the parish council, the ward member, the National Trust, Middlemarch and council officers, the project is one step closer to becoming a reality. The next step is to apply for planning permission.

Principal Housing Member of the North Devon Council, Councilor Nicola Topham says: “Social rent is the most affordable form of rental; it is often up to half the cost of rent on the open market. If the program materializes, it will increase the supply of social housing. housing in our neighbourhood, which will help alleviate the enormous pressures on our housing market, currently aggravated by the housing crisis.

“We are delighted that our contribution can enable the delivery of this much needed accommodation in Woolacombe, giving 21 families a place to call home at truly affordable rent while providing longer term security of tenure.”

Amanda Williams, Chief Investment Officer of Aster Group, said: “It is often difficult to find affordable housing in rural communities, so it is great that this community-led project has taken a significant step forward by receiving this funding from North Devon Council. We are always keen to work closely with our vital local authorities to help them meet their affordable housing needs, and this project is no exception. We look forward to continuing to support Mortehoe and Woolacombe CLT in delivering much needed affordable housing to the local community.

The council’s funding of the gap is part of their goal to tackle the housing crisis in the district through a number of measures, including looking at how to fund the provision of affordable housing through community-led housing models community, both financially and in terms of personnel. .

Council’s contribution to Woolacombe social rental housing is made by varying the council’s capital program to the amount needed to continue development. More than half of the budget consists of commuted monies for affordable housing (when affordable housing cannot be provided on a housing site, often because the need for affordable housing is a fraction rather than an entire build). The rest comes from funds from the government’s Community Housing Fund and the council-approved capital program.

People looking for affordable housing should sign up for Devon Home Choice; only registrants will be considered for the program.

Anyone wishing to join and become a member of CLT Mortehoe and Woolacombe can email mwclt@outlook.com or contact their Facebook page.

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Donations are sought to protect the North Pender Island Forest https://nflandtrust.org/donations-are-sought-to-protect-the-north-pender-island-forest/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 01:01:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/donations-are-sought-to-protect-the-north-pender-island-forest/ The Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the Pender Islands Conservancy Association have less than a week to raise over $100,000 to meet their original fundraising goal to protect 45 acres known as KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest on North Pende The Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the Pender Islands Conservancy Association have less than a week to contribute more […]]]>

The Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the Pender Islands Conservancy Association have less than a week to raise over $100,000 to meet their original fundraising goal to protect 45 acres known as KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest on North Pende

The Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the Pender Islands Conservancy Association have less than a week to contribute more than $100,000 towards their initial fundraising goal to protect 45 acres known as KELÁ_EKE Kingfisher Forest on the island. North Pender.

The groups are trying to raise a total of $2.1 million to buy the land, which sits on the edge of Plumper Sound, overlooking killer whale habitat, and is considered a vital part of the area’s watershed. The southwestern edge of the forest adjoins Gardom Pond, a five-acre regionally protected wetland.

A campaign to raise an initial $200,000, matched by an anonymous donor and the Sitka Foundation — a family foundation that supports conservation organizations and causes — began March 21 and will run through Wednesday. The groups hope to have $500,000 in hand by the end of the matching campaign.

The property now belongs to a private owner.

On Friday, the Islands Trust Conservancy added a $5,000 grant to the matching campaign. Shauna Doll, forestry project coordinator for the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, praised the contribution.

“Islands Trust Conservancy is a regional land trust focused on safeguarding the lands and waters of the Salish Sea,” she said. “It is made up of biologists who know and intimately understand the state of coastal Douglas-fir forests and associated habitats.

So far, the matching campaign has raised nearly $90,000 from individuals and businesses.

To make a donation, go to raincoast.org/forest.

jbell@timescolonist.com

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