Land Trust – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 22:09:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://nflandtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-138x136.png Land Trust – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ 32 32 Drowning in the options on Tuesday I give https://nflandtrust.org/drowning-in-the-options-on-tuesday-i-give/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 21:35:59 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/drowning-in-the-options-on-tuesday-i-give/ The Greater Worcester Land Trust’s ‘Giving Tuesday’ campaign asks a question that will certainly touch the hearts of most Worcesterites: “Does this pothole seem welcoming to you?“The campaign is to ‘plug the potholes at the trailhead in the Donker Farm parking lot,’ but let’s face it: a sense of humor helps sell these things, especially […]]]>

The Greater Worcester Land Trust’s ‘Giving Tuesday’ campaign asks a question that will certainly touch the hearts of most Worcesterites: “Does this pothole seem welcoming to you?“The campaign is to ‘plug the potholes at the trailhead in the Donker Farm parking lot,’ but let’s face it: a sense of humor helps sell these things, especially here in Worcester, and Potholes are a Worcesterite’s natural enemy in nature. (In the interest of disclosure, my wife works part-time for GWLT.)

“Giving Tuesday” is one of those things that popped up online a few years ago and has taken root in culture, a selfless antidote to Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Cyber ​​Monday. That it coincides with the year-end tax depreciation donations doesn’t hurt either. The problem, of course, is that most campaigns start on the Tuesday I donate, and so social and work media struggle to keep up. Everyone’s Twitter feeds are saturated with #GivingTuesday tweets, and reporters can’t really figure out what’s going on until the end of the day. Never mind the impression! Fortunately, most nonprofits are smart enough to keep their campaigns open for a week or even a month.

The Greater Worcester Land Trust collects donations by summoning the deadly enemy of all Worcesterites: the Pothole.

While some nonprofits take a pleasant approach to attracting the attention of donors, others outline exactly what your donation will accomplish. Abby’s House, for example, is trying to raise $ 15,000 for its food and nutrition program, helping more than 60 women in need with two pantry distributions per month, two hot meals each week, eight community meals each month and holiday meals. This is a compelling argument while food insecurity remains a major problem.



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Singapore, Malaysia reopen land border amid concerns over Omicron variant https://nflandtrust.org/singapore-malaysia-reopen-land-border-amid-concerns-over-omicron-variant/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 05:34:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/singapore-malaysia-reopen-land-border-amid-concerns-over-omicron-variant/ SINGAPORE, Nov. 29 (Reuters) – Singapore and Malaysia reopened one of the world’s busiest land borders on Monday, allowing vaccinated travelers to cross after nearly two years of closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although travelers appreciated the opportunity to reunite with family and friends, some feared the border would be closed again due to […]]]>

SINGAPORE, Nov. 29 (Reuters) – Singapore and Malaysia reopened one of the world’s busiest land borders on Monday, allowing vaccinated travelers to cross after nearly two years of closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Although travelers appreciated the opportunity to reunite with family and friends, some feared the border would be closed again due to the new variant of the Omicron coronavirus.

At Queen Street Bus Station in Singapore, a few dozen people waiting to board the first buses to Malaysia expressed caution.

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“The borders may close soon because of the new variant,” said Eugene Ho, a 31-year-old banker leaving Singapore for the first time in nearly two years. “I’m actually very worried about getting stuck.”

Travelers must test negative for COVID-19 before departure, and Malaysia also requires travelers to be tested upon arrival, a decision Singapore followed on Sunday amid concerns over the Omicron variant.

Malaysian Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob was greeted Monday by Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at one of the land border crossings, his first official visit as Prime Minister to Singapore.

Siva Kumar, a 41-year-old engineer in the semiconductor industry, had been inundated with calls from his two teenage sons who were anxiously awaiting his return.

“All morning long they keep yelling, ‘Where are you now? Have you ever taken the bus?'” Kumar said. “(I want to) hug them, kiss them. I really missed them.”

Up to 300,000 Malaysians traveled to Singapore daily before the pandemic.

The sudden border closure in March 2020 left tens of thousands stranded on both sides, separated from their families and fearing for their jobs.

Under the new agreement, up to 1,440 travelers on each side can cross the land border each day without quarantine, if they hold citizenship, permanent residence or long-term visas in the destination country, according to guidelines. published by the Government of Singapore.

A vaccinated airlift route between the two countries also began on Monday.

Singapore has vaccinated 85% of its entire population, while around 80% of the Malaysian population has been vaccinated.

Singapore, with an aging population of 5.5 million, relies heavily on Malaysians living in the southern state of Johor to staff businesses ranging from restaurants to semiconductor manufacturing.

Singapore reported 747 locally acquired COVID-19 cases on Sunday, the lowest tally since mid-September. Malaysia reported 4,239 cases on Sunday, the lowest number since early November.

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Reporting by Joe Brock and Chen Lin; Editing by John Geddie, Ed Davies, Karishma Singh and Gerry Doyle

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Nevada County adopts BYLT’s Hirschman Pond Trail – YubaNet https://nflandtrust.org/nevada-county-adopts-bylts-hirschman-pond-trail-yubanet/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 14:01:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/nevada-county-adopts-bylts-hirschman-pond-trail-yubanet/ Nevada County recently entered into an “Adopt-a-Trail” agreement to support the eastern part of the beloved region Hirschman Pond Trail in Nevada City. Hirshman Trail is minutes from the Eric Rood Center and is a source of enjoyment for County staff almost every day. Employees frequently use the trail for walks and lunch breaks to […]]]>

Nevada County recently entered into an “Adopt-a-Trail” agreement to support the eastern part of the beloved region Hirschman Pond Trail in Nevada City. Hirshman Trail is minutes from the Eric Rood Center and is a source of enjoyment for County staff almost every day. Employees frequently use the trail for walks and lunch breaks to relax and unwind outside. County staff now have the option to give back to the trail.

Over the next two years, county staff will volunteer for stewardship, maintenance, and non-work-related bi-monthly inspections for the Bear Yuba Land Trust (BYLT). Through the BYLT program, staff volunteers will walk the trail one-on-one to check for litter, vandalism, safety issues and general maintenance. Teams from county departments will tackle larger projects such as erosion control, construction of a retaining wall, spreading of gravel to maintain the trail surface, brush maintenance and the preservation of the path of the path.

Nevada County will adopt the first mile of the trail in the eastern part, from the tail of the parking lot to the Woods Ravine section, as the volunteers have already adopted the other parts of the trail. Learn more about BYLT’s Adopt-A-Trail program at www.bylt.org.

About the Hirschman Pond Trail

Just a mile from the heart of downtown Nevada City, this trail system, partially built by the Land Trust, quickly immerses you in nature with many different activities. The centerpiece is the Hirschman Pond. In 2021, Hirschman’s Pond was designated a Nevada County Historic Landmark in honor of pioneer miner Leb Hirschman and the Jewish community who settled there during the Gold Rush.

The 0.4 mile trail is built to ADA standards, providing barrier-free access to Hirschman’s Pond. Highlighting this section of the trail, a 40-foot-long easel was built to replicate the railway and canal building techniques of the late 1800s.

West of the pond, the trail narrows and winds through oak forests, pines and meadows for an additional 3 km. Hirschman Pond is made up of five acres of water from natural springs at the foot of high cliffs carved by hydraulic exploitation of the area in the 1800s. Now people visit to enjoy the tranquil scenery, fishing along the river. shore and observe wildlife including ducks, geese and herons on the pond. There is a nice bench on the south side of the pond to take in the view.


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Comox Valley Regional District Conservation Area Obtains Official Aboriginal Name – Comox Valley Record https://nflandtrust.org/comox-valley-regional-district-conservation-area-obtains-official-aboriginal-name-comox-valley-record/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 21:30:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/comox-valley-regional-district-conservation-area-obtains-official-aboriginal-name-comox-valley-record/ The Comox Valley Regional District announced on November 25 that the park located upstream of Morrison Creek, which protects 22 hectares of aquatic and riparian habitat, has been officially named the qax mot conservation area. qax mot location map This land, zoned for conservation in Electoral Zone C, was purchased in 2019 in partnership with […]]]>

The Comox Valley Regional District announced on November 25 that the park located upstream of Morrison Creek, which protects 22 hectares of aquatic and riparian habitat, has been officially named the qax mot conservation area.

qax mot location map

This land, zoned for conservation in Electoral Zone C, was purchased in 2019 in partnership with the Comox Valley Land Trust and made possible with the support of the Morrison Creek Streamkeepers. When purchasing the land, CVRD contacted the K’ómoks First Nation on its behalf. After consulting with Elders and knowledge keepers, Hegus Rempel informed the CVRD that the K’ómoks people had chosen the name qax word, which means a lot of medicine in the traditional language ay̓aǰuθəm (ayajuthem). Ayajuthem is a Coast Salish language shared among the peoples of K’ómoks, Tla’amin, Homalco and Klahoose. qax word is pronounced “qah (with an accent on the h) mote”.

“We are very proud to unite on this land called qax mot with the K’ómoks First Nation – our partners, friends and traditional custodians of this unceded land,” said Comox Valley Regional District President Jesse Ketler. “This park was purchased with the Comox Valley Land Trust for conservation purposes and is an example of how we can work together to support and protect the land and waters that support our community for generations to come.”

“The name of the word qax conservation area represents a small step in the right direction towards reconciliation,” said K’ómoks Hegus Nicole Rempel. “This ayajuthem name recognizes the long history of the traditional use of the land by our people, as well as the culturally important practice of gathering medicinal plants. Our partnership with CVRD is a prime example of how our communities can work together to responsibly manage our water and lands and protect them for future generations.

The qax mot conservation area is accessible from Lake Trail Road. Vehicle parking is available in the Linton Conservation Area, northeast of the park entrance.

From the park entrance, a 1.8 km trail follows an old road to Morrison Creek and bypasses a short loop trail to the Morrison Creek Bridge. Signs indicate the entrance to the park and the location of the trails. The southwest side of the qax mot conservation area is reserved for park visitors to help protect the sensitive habitat and wildlife living in this area of ​​the park.

Comox Valley Native


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Trudeau Institute appoints new board of directors | News, Sports, Jobs https://nflandtrust.org/trudeau-institute-appoints-new-board-of-directors-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 05:15:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/trudeau-institute-appoints-new-board-of-directors-news-sports-jobs/ Kip Testwuide (Photo provided) LAC SARANAC – The Trudeau Institute has elected Kip Testwuide, Investment Banker and Managing Member of High Peaks Advisors LLC, as the new Chairman of the Board. Testwuide, of Lake Placid, holds the post left by Dr. Dorothy Federman, who retired as president in August after serving on Trudeau’s board of […]]]>

Kip Testwuide (Photo provided)

LAC SARANAC – The Trudeau Institute has elected Kip Testwuide, Investment Banker and Managing Member of High Peaks Advisors LLC, as the new Chairman of the Board.

Testwuide, of Lake Placid, holds the post left by Dr. Dorothy Federman, who retired as president in August after serving on Trudeau’s board of directors for 40 years.

Julie North, partner at the law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore, and Dr. Brian Pollok, co-founder, president and CEO of biotech company Propagenix Inc., have been appointed co-vice-presidents.

Victoria Derbyshire, a public health expert who served as deputy director of the Wadsworth Center in Albany, has also been appointed to the board.

“It is a remarkable honor to follow in Dorothy’s footsteps”, said Testwuide, who has served on Trudeau’s board of directors since 2018. “Dorothy has been a surefire guide and inspiration as Trudeau continues to evolve.

“Under his leadership, we have strengthened our commitment to protect global health by strengthening our own research initiatives and leveraging these capacities to work more closely with outside institutions,” he added. “We are all grateful for his vision and his long service. “

Federman, who has chaired Trudeau since 2019, joined its board in 1981. At the time, she had recently launched her medical career at Saranac Lake and was working alongside Frank Trudeau, founding president of the institute. When he asked her to join the board, Federman recalls, she wasn’t even sure what a board was doing. But her experience as a doctor and as a scientist’s daughter helped her level up quickly.

“I resign at the time of Trudeau’s rise”, said Federman. “Trudeau has his feet firmly planted below. Our newer and younger board members ask questions I never thought would ask and inhabit areas of thought critical to the continuing success of the institute. They are ready to carry the torch and it is time for me to become an ambassador.

Trudeau President and Director Atsuo Kuki announced that Trudeau would rename his Early Career Scholars Program Dorothy J. Federman Postdoctoral Program, and dedicated a terrace in his honor. He praised Federman’s leadership and generosity as she stepped down.

“Under his guidance, the Trudeau Company has taken action against some of the most pressing threats to global health as we preserve, honor and extend the Trudeau legacy,” Kuki said. “Dorothy has been a direct link between Frank Trudeau and the dynamic legacy of our history, right down to the modern challenges of drug-resistant tuberculosis and the novel coronavirus.

“We have hired new teams of scientists and research technicians who bring their specific skills to our unique laboratory”, he added. “We have broadened our dedication to the region’s economic strength and, at the same time, to the medical well-being of our northern community, something clearly brought relief when we partnered with institutions in the region to fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. ”

Federman’s successor, Testwuide, has served as Trudeau’s vice president since 2019. Testwuide had a 30-year career in investment banking in New York City, most recently heading the fixed income division of BNP Paribas in the Americas.

He is a member of Point Positive, an angel investor group growing new businesses in Adirondack Park. He also serves on the boards of the Adirondack Land Trust, the New York State Ski Education Foundation, the University of Wisconsin, the College of Letters and Science and the Beaver Dam Sanctuary. Testwuide lives in Lake Placid.

North, a partner in the litigation department of the New York law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore, has served on Trudeau’s board of directors since 2013. She has a long-standing relationship with the institute: her father, Robert North, was Trudeau’s third director and remains honorary trustee. North is a board member of Central City Chorus and Everybody Wins! New York; She also sits on the Advocates Council of Human Rights First and the Legal Momentum Council of Legal Advisors. She lives in New York.

Pollok is co-founder, president and CEO of Propagenix Inc., a Maryland-based biotechnology company specializing in epithelial tissue modeling and cell therapy.

During his 40-year career, Pollok served in the medical school at Wake Forest University. He has served as a senior biotech research and development executive for several Fortune 500 companies and was president of the country’s oldest not-for-profit biotech organization. He was the University of Virginia’s first Entrepreneur in Residence, where he launched two biotech startups as CEOs.

He has served on several not-for-profit boards related to biomedical research, including the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the NIH Center for Regenerative Medicine, and the Dean’s Office at UCSD. He is an instructor at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at AVU and lives in Albemarle County, Virginia.

Derbyshire spent 28 years at the Wadsworth Center in Albany, where she served as Deputy Director for seven years.

Originally from England, Derbyshire joined Wadsworth in 1992 as an NIH-supported postdoctoral fellow. She holds a doctorate in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University, as well as a patent on the use of inteins to purify proteins. She lives in Slingerlands.

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Solano Land Trust opens 2 properties for holiday weekend https://nflandtrust.org/solano-land-trust-opens-2-properties-for-holiday-weekend/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 13:48:40 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/solano-land-trust-opens-2-properties-for-holiday-weekend/ ROCKVILLE – Two of the main Solano Land Trust open spaces in the region will open this weekend for three activities spread over Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The offers are: 9th Black Friday #OptOutside & Walk-off that Turkey, Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Patwino Worrtla Kodoi Dihi Open Space: Not in the usual […]]]>

ROCKVILLE – Two of the main Solano Land Trust open spaces in the region will open this weekend for three activities spread over Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The offers are:

9th Black Friday #OptOutside & Walk-off that Turkey, Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Patwino Worrtla Kodoi Dihi Open Space: Not in the usual Black Friday overload of consumption-shopping and sports television? Gather Thanksgiving leftovers for lunch, family and out-of-town guests, and come explore a quiet, hidden gem of Solano County with the docents of the Solano Land Trust. Explore the hills between Suisun Valley and Green Valley, and take in breathtaking views of Solano County and beyond. Walk through oak forests as the leaves change and climb hills to reach Solano County vistas you won’t find anywhere else. Meet at the large red “Ice House” building at the corner of Rockville and Suisun Valley roads. It is recommended to register in advance on the Solano Land Trust website at https://solanolandtrust.org/. Select the Events tab and search for this event.

Volunteer opportunity for track crews, Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Patwino Worrtla Kodoi Dihi open space: Help build new trails in the old Rockville Trails reserve and at the same time get a glimpse of the new trail system and meet earth-caring people in Solano County. Most importantly, attendees can be part of the legacy of opening the property to the public. Meet at the large red “Ice House” building at the corner of Rockville and Suisun Valley roads. It is recommended to register in advance on the Solano Land Trust website at https://solanolandtrust.org/. Select the Events tab and search for this event.

Bird of Prey Hike, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Lynch Canyon Open Space: Solano Land Trust and Solano County Parks present Lynch Canyon’s first Bird of Prey hike of the winter migration season. Lynch Canyon is home to golden eagles and hawks. It is also a magnet for migrating and wintering birds of prey. It provides them with over 1,000 undeveloped acres where they can hunt and rest. Some feathered visitors come from as far away as the Arctic Circle. This hike will be 4-6 miles. The guided hike is $ 10 per person. Parking costs $ 6 per vehicle, which supports Solano County Parks. Lynch Canyon is located at 3100 Lynch Road between Fairfield and Vallejo. Prior registration is required on the Solano Land Trust website at https://solanolandtrust.org/. Select the Events tab and search for this event.

Advance reservations for each activity can also be made by phone at 707-432-0150 or by email at [email protected].


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Man gets 35 years in prison in Cheyenne stabbing case https://nflandtrust.org/man-gets-35-years-in-prison-in-cheyenne-stabbing-case/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 20:37:09 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/man-gets-35-years-in-prison-in-cheyenne-stabbing-case/ CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) – A man convicted of stabbing his then girlfriend, causing serious injury, has been sentenced to 35 years in prison. District Judge Peter Froelicher sentenced Anthony Brassard to 25 to 35 years in prison on Friday, the Wyoming Tribune Eagle reported. Brassard was initially charged with attempted first degree murder late last […]]]>

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) – A man convicted of stabbing his then girlfriend, causing serious injury, has been sentenced to 35 years in prison.

District Judge Peter Froelicher sentenced Anthony Brassard to 25 to 35 years in prison on Friday, the Wyoming Tribune Eagle reported. Brassard was initially charged with attempted first degree murder late last summer, but in August he argued unchallenged to attempted second degree murder as part of a deal with prosecutors.

Police officers in Cheyenne discovered the injured woman on August 30, 2020, when they responded to reports that someone was screaming for help from an apartment with blood around the door, court documents show.


Inside, they found the woman with stab wounds, as well as Armband. She was taken to a hospital where medical staff estimated that she had lost half of her blood volume. Police later learned that the woman had been stabbed and cut about 30 times on her legs, arms, chest and back, with a chest wound that severed her spleen.

At the sentencing hearing on Friday, the woman said she lived in constant fear of the attack.

“Please don’t make my survival worthless,” she said, addressing the judge.

Brassard did not address the court directly. His public defender Brandon Booth noted that he had no criminal history and said he had taken responsibility for his actions. Booth said he believed Brassard suffered some sort of trauma as a child that caused his heavy drinking, depression and previous suicide attempts, as well as the violent incident in this case.

Froelicher said Brassard seemed to genuinely have remorse, but said the crime was heinous and required a heavy sentence.


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Morris County NJ can purchase and preserve 43 acres of land https://nflandtrust.org/morris-county-nj-can-purchase-and-preserve-43-acres-of-land/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 09:52:37 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/morris-county-nj-can-purchase-and-preserve-43-acres-of-land/ Forty-three acres of land in Morris County are being considered for purchase and preservation. The Morris County Open Space Trust Fund Committee recommended that the County Commissioners Council approve $ 1.3 million to acquire and preserve the lands in Dover, Montville, Parsippany and Chatham Township. “Residents have flocked to these sites to find solace and […]]]>

Forty-three acres of land in Morris County are being considered for purchase and preservation.

The Morris County Open Space Trust Fund Committee recommended that the County Commissioners Council approve $ 1.3 million to acquire and preserve the lands in Dover, Montville, Parsippany and Chatham Township.

“Residents have flocked to these sites to find solace and simply enjoy the outdoors during the pandemic. In fact, visits to our open spaces, parks and trails have quadrupled during this time, ”said Managing Commissioner Stephen H. Shaw. “I know I speak for the whole board when I say this is one of the most important things we do as commissioners.”

The four sites vary in size from one-fifth of an acre to nearly 20 acres.

Properties

The Jean Drive reserve in Montville is being considered for a 2021 preservation grant.
  • In Montville, the Jean Drive Reserve is a 19.62 acre aquifer located in the Critical Water Resources District of the Towaco Valley Aquifer, between Old Lane and Jean Drive. The grant of $ 465,000 would protect the land and its associated water supply.
  • In Dover, the East Blackwell Street property is floodplain near the city center. The vacant land, which is 0.20 acre wide, is adjacent to a stocked section of Rockaway River trout which would receive $ 35,000.
  • In Chatham Township, the McDon Fen Property consists of two 17.74 acre properties facing Southern Boulevard. The largest property is a wooded and swampy area that contains a tributary of Black Creek that flows into the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge and ultimately into the Passaic River. The $ 350,000 grant would help preserve the land and expand Nash Park.
  • In Parsippany, the Kosut property is located near Knoll Road, surrounded by lands to the north and south that were previously preserved and belong to the township. The 5.44 acre area would receive $ 450,000 with plans to become a park and recreational facility.
The vacant residential land located on the south side of East Blackwell Street at the T-intersection of Sammis Avenue is being considered for a 2021 preservation grant. It is adjacent to a stocked section of Rockaway River trout.

“These are four great additions to an exceptional lineup of open space projects that will help make Morris County a great place to live and work,” said Jay Thomson, who chairs the County Trust Fund Committee. Morris, composed of 15 members, who presented the recommendations to the Commissioners.

Local:Morris County Park Police to be integrated into Sheriff’s Office after Commissioner’s vote



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Positive changes refute climate ‘catastrophism’ https://nflandtrust.org/positive-changes-refute-climate-catastrophism/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 16:38:44 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/positive-changes-refute-climate-catastrophism/ Since Julie and her husband John Ott moved to her parents’ farm, the James Ranch north of Durango, three decades ago, three more siblings have joined them on the 400-acre farm where they produce meat, vegetables, fruit, eggs and cheese which is sold through their own restaurant and market. Demand has grown so much that […]]]>

Since Julie and her husband John Ott moved to her parents’ farm, the James Ranch north of Durango, three decades ago, three more siblings have joined them on the 400-acre farm where they produce meat, vegetables, fruit, eggs and cheese which is sold through their own restaurant and market.

Demand has grown so much that they are now partnering with over 50 local farms and ranches in the community, as well as the Valley Roots Food Center in the San Luis Valley and the Southwest Food Co-op.

“Something extremely exciting is happening, and I believe it is happening all over the world,” said Julie Ott. “We need to adapt to our local communities, do it right and use our resources to their fullest potential. “


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The proposal would see a new golf course; 2,000 housing units, shops in Larchmont https://nflandtrust.org/the-proposal-would-see-a-new-golf-course-2000-housing-units-shops-in-larchmont/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 23:08:32 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/the-proposal-would-see-a-new-golf-course-2000-housing-units-shops-in-larchmont/ According to the proposal, the developers would transform the Larchmont golf course into a new neighborhood with a target of 2,000 new homes, new doctor’s offices and business opportunities. They would give the county 157 nearby acres for a new route. (photo of Larchmont golf course) Calling it an opportunity to solve Missoula’s housing crisis […]]]>
According to the proposal, the developers would transform the Larchmont golf course into a new neighborhood with a target of 2,000 new homes, new doctor’s offices and business opportunities. They would give the county 157 nearby acres for a new route. (photo of Larchmont golf course)

Calling it an opportunity to solve Missoula’s housing crisis on a transformational scale, a team of developers on Monday unveiled a proposal to redevelop the Larchmont golf course with a mix of housing, commercial and medical facilities.

A new 18-hole golf course could be built to replace Larchmont on the neighboring property, as well as trails, a new lodge and a boat launch on the Bitterroot River. The existing course is only used seasonally and does not serve the highest and best use of the community given its housing need, the developers argue.

But the Larchmont golfing community on Monday expressed opposition to starting a new course, and county commissioners have handed the developers the responsibility of securing public support for their proposal as it unfolds. form.

The county will be developing a work plan over the next few weeks to help answer a long list of questions. A decision could take at least a year.

“This is a transformation of the landscape on a generational scale,” said Commissioner Josh Slotnick. “There is no way to move forward without going through a thorough and real public process, and giving developers a chance to develop a plan that the golf community would really love, and a chance for the golf community to develop. ‘get their details in a row also. “

As proposed, the developers would give the county 157 acres located nearby on Highway 93 in exchange for the Larchmont golf course. The course is located next to Reserve Street in an existing commercial corridor close to municipal services, public transportation, public parks and a medical center.

The proposed new golf course is in undeveloped land that cannot be built on due to its location in the floodplain. But it could serve as a recreational attraction, according to WGM Group, which represents the developers.

“We wouldn’t open this discussion without having an alternate location to bring to the table for Larchmont,” said Jeff Smith, senior engineer at WGM Group. “This basic idea is a concept that allows Missoula workers to stay in Missoula and not be moved by the ever increasing cost of renting or owning a home in Missoula.”

According to the proposal, the developers would transform the Larchmont golf course into a new neighborhood with a target of 2,000 new homes, new doctor’s offices and business opportunities.

Of the 2,000 housing units proposed, approximately 800 would be owner-occupied single-family homes built on a community land trust to protect affordability. The project would also include 300 to 400 multi-family dwellings targeting less than 80% of the median income in the region, as well as 450 residences for the elderly.

Kate Dinsmore of the WGM Group said the project will create enough accessible and affordable housing to start moving the dial in Missoula. The median price of a house in the city now stands at over $ 400,000 per year – a price that far exceeds the reach of local wages.

Many residents of Missoula have been excluded from the existing market. About 25% of landlords are considered to have a financial burden, as are 50% of tenants, which means that more than 30% of their income is spent on housing.

“We all know house prices exceed wages in Missoula,” Dinsmore said. “But the increased supply along with the economies of scale within this development will help smooth out escalating prices in single-family homes and apartments living in the community. We also have an aging population and there is a need for the elderly in the community.

The increase in the city’s housing stock on such a large scale and within city limits near existing services and two major transportation corridors has made housing advocates anxious to see the proposal approved.

But a number of questions remain unanswered, such as the value of Larchmont’s 152-acre course, the value of the 157 acres planned for a new course, who will design and build the new course, and how the public can be assured of affordable and accessible housing is part of any new development.

“If this were to go forward, it would be a very long process,” said Emily Brock, director of economic development and land for Missoula County. “Larchmont is a valuable public facility with enormous use. The county will take a measured and considered approach to any idea to develop it. However, this is a bold proposition that could add significant housing supply to our market. “

A screenshot of a first rendering of the proposed housing development.

Out of the gate, at least, the board of directors that oversees the Larchmont golf course has already voted unanimously to oppose the proposal. Several members spoke out against the concept on Monday, saying the idea should not be explored at all.

While there is a need for housing in Missoula, they said, moving away from a public golf course is a bad idea, even if it can be replaced with a new, more modern and efficient course.

“I don’t think replacing it is a viable option because of the work it takes and the time it takes to develop and evolve a golf course,” said Bill Galiher, Director of Golf at Larchmont. “We have people who have been playing there for 40 years waiting for our trees to grow. Moving to a site that takes another 40 years to develop and grow wouldn’t be fair to the people who developed that place.

Commissioner Dave Strohmaier, a former member of Larchmont’s board of directors, said he sympathizes with the golf community.

“I fully understand and sympathize with the concerns of the golf community and of those who have invested time, energy, money and a large part of their lives into this facility,” he said. . “I can’t think of a project I’ve been lukewarm on in the last few days. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t continue with the public process and get concrete answers to any questions we might have. “

The increase in the city’s housing stock played a secondary role amid fears of losing the Larchmont route on Monday, which marked the first public hearing on the proposal.

The developers suggested that a new course could be professionally designed and include a number of amenities that the existing course lacks. This could include a more sustainable irrigation system, bike and walking trails, winter skiing, a boat launch, as well as a pro shop and restaurant that also serves as a community center in the winter. . It could also include golf simulators for the winter season.

Some golfers have expressed their support.

“I know you have heard negative comments from people heavily invested in the Larchmont golf community about the idea of ​​changing the way golf works in Missoula, but there are other golfers who live in Missoula and love golf and are interested in significant architecture. New golf course, ”said a caller identified as Jessie.


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