Land Resources – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 05:57:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://nflandtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-138x136.png Land Resources – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ 32 32 Ten new environmental laws in California https://nflandtrust.org/ten-new-environmental-laws-in-california/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 01:03:42 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/ten-new-environmental-laws-in-california/ David Jiang via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0 The environmental community continued to achieve victories in the state legislature despite another unusual year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and a recall election for governor. We have successfully navigated video meetings and remote testimonials to advance climate and health policies with the help of coalition partners, […]]]>

David Jiang via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0

The environmental community continued to achieve victories in the state legislature despite another unusual year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and a recall election for governor. We have successfully navigated video meetings and remote testimonials to advance climate and health policies with the help of coalition partners, environmental champions in the legislature and an engaged governor. . We were also faced with disappointing results and fierce lobbying of powerful interests trying to thwart progress. As the climate crisis progresses, the NRDC and its partners will continue to push state leaders to adopt bold policies that can become models for other jurisdictions. There is always more work to be done, but it is also important to reflect and mark the progress we have made. Below are ten key bills that were passed by the legislature and signed by Governor Newsom in 2021. Most of these new laws come into force in January 2022, unless otherwise specified.

Weather

SB 596 (Becker) requires the California Air Resources Board to develop a comprehensive strategy by July 1, 2023 to reduce the carbon intensity of cement use by 40% from 2019 levels by 2030 and to achieve carbon neutrality in this sector by 2045 at the latest. Read more.

AB 525 (Chiu) advances responsibly developed offshore wind power. The bill will revive California’s process of building offshore wind power as part of the state’s clean electricity mix in a way that does not harm fragile marine ecosystems and biodiversity. Read more.

SB 339 (Wiener) establishes a pilot program to test road user charges which will be adjusted according to vehicle efficiency instead of a flat rate. By promoting vehicle efficiency, this program can become a key strategy to reduce emissions from global warming and dangerous air pollution. Recommendations for the design of the pilot program must be sent to the Transportation Agency by July 1, 2023. Read more.

Protect communities from pollution

Most microwave popcorn bags on store shelves are made with PFAS chemicals

AB 1200 (Ting), the Safer Food Packaging and Cookware Act, will protect our food, health and environment by banning the use of toxic PFAS chemicals “forever” in paper-based food packaging and will require disclosure. chemicals like PFAS and bisphenols in cookware. The ban takes effect on January 1, 2023. Read more.

SB 47 (Limon) helps clean up abandoned oil and gas wells that pose significant risks to public health and the environment. Read more.

Reduce single-use plastics

AB 1276 (Carrillo) – expands state law on on-demand straws to include other single-use food accessories such as utensils and condiment packets.

SB 343 (Allen) – prohibits the use of the “arrow hunting” symbol on plastic products unless they are truly recyclable. The provisions of the bill are expected to come into force by January 1, 2024. SB 343 will help consumers make informed choices about the products and packaging they buy. Read more.

Racial justice

Anthony Bruce, the great-great-grandson of the original owners of Bruce’s Beach, owns SB 796 after Governor Gavin Newsom promulgated it on September 30, 2021.

SB 796 (Bradford) – allows Los Angeles County to return land in Manhattan Beach, known as Bruce’s Beach, to the living descendants of owners who were illegally taken that land in the 1920s simply because of their race. Read more.

Safe and climate-friendly streets

AB 43 (Friedman) – demands that cities take into account the presence of vulnerable groups, including children, the elderly, the homeless and people with disabilities when setting speed limits, and allow cities to reduce speed limits on streets with a history of traffic safety issues.

AB 773 (Nazarian) – helps limit cars to local streets and create safe outdoor spaces for recreation by permanently allowing “slow streets”. Read more.

Look ahead

As we prepare for the return of lawmakers to Sacramento on January 3, our team and other environmental and public health advocates are working on a number of unfinished jobs from 2021 and developing new plans for State budget law and proposals, in particular:

  • Add concrete to the state’s Buy Clean program to better account for its greenhouse gas emissions, offer incentives for the most climate-friendly products and align state purchases with our climate goals (SB 778, Becker)
  • Require California corporations, financial institutions, and insurers to assess and report climate-related financial risks to the state in order to plan and account for those risks (SB 449, stern)
  • Doubling California’s Climate Ambition and Breaking Down Barriers to Meeting Current Clean Energy Goals
  • Move our cars, trucks, buses and vehicle fleets to zero emissions and ensure low income people have access to clean vehicles
  • Ensure that the state’s transition to a zero-emission future centers equity and creates quality national jobs
  • Enabling the construction of more affordable housing and climate-friendly neighborhoods by eliminating unnecessary parking requirements
  • Making our neighborhoods safer and more welcoming for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Improve water efficiency, affordability and access to drinking water
  • Improving drought preparedness and climate resilience
  • Protecting Californians from Toxic PFAS Chemicals “Forever” in Products We Use and Lead in Drinking Water
  • Ensure strict implementation of Governor Newsom’s 30 x 30 Executive Decree to conserve 30 percent of land and waterways by 2030 and increase access to nature for all communities
  • Finalize strict rules to demand health protection rollbacks of new oil wells and pollution controls on existing wells. Phase out oil drilling in and around the sea and clean up all orphaned and abandoned wells statewide
  • Help low-income communities and communities of color cope better with extreme heat with community resilience centers and improved, carbon-free cooling in their homes
  • Ensure a robust and inclusive planning process for offshore wind so that it can be built quickly, with minimal impact on marine ecosystems
  • Reduce the use of toxic pesticides that harm bees and our health; help socially disadvantaged small farmers to switch to organic production; and increase investments in just and resilient food and agricultural systems

In addition, we look forward to the adoption without further delay of President Biden’s Build Back Better program. The Build Back Better program will deliver multiple climatic and societal benefits to California and includes funding for electric vehicles and charging infrastructure, water infrastructure, orphan well cleaning, and more.

In January, Governor Newsom publishes his budget proposal giving us a window on the administration’s funding priorities. With another budget surplus expected, we urge heads of state to increase investment in key environmental, climate justice and public health priorities.

We also look forward to November 2022, when California voters have the opportunity to support a voting measure to limit single-use plastics and ensure that many of our plastic products are recyclable or compostable. Read more here.

As we close the books this year, we celebrate progress towards a healthy and fair California. And we are poised to achieve even greater victories for our environment and our communities and to assert California’s leadership for other states, regions and countries.


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Agriculture in transition – A new Net Zero focus? https://nflandtrust.org/agriculture-in-transition-a-new-net-zero-focus/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 13:56:37 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/agriculture-in-transition-a-new-net-zero-focus/ Freight Train Loading Grain into Freight Cars / Freight Cars in Farm Elevators Along National … [+] Route 16, highway in the province of Chaco, Argentina. (Photo by: Marica van der Meer / Arterra / Universal Images Group via Getty Images) Arterra Group / Universal Images via Getty Images COP26 saw a welcome recognition of […]]]>

COP26 saw a welcome recognition of the importance of nature and its relationship to climate change. Urgent action on land use is needed as demand for food increases, as the world is currently losing forests, damaging soils, and rapidly destroying other ecosystems that play critical roles in carbon uptake and the cooling of the planet. As commitments to action multiply, could collaboration within large companies lead the way?

The IPCC has estimated that 23% of global GHG emissions are associated with land use, including 11% of global GHG emissions from deforestation and conversion of natural ecosystems. One of the most salient points of discussion at COP26 was the need to establish more sustainable food systems, as changes in temperature and climate can disrupt supply chains, affect productivity and drive up prices. commodities.

Many promising announcements were made at COP26 regarding the importance of deforestation – for example, 100 world leaders representing 85% of forest cover pledged to halt and reverse deforestation and land degradation here 2030. Twenty-eight governments announced commitments through the Forest, Agriculture and Commodity Trade (FACT) Dialogue Roadmap for Action, which called on governments to increase sustainable trade in agricultural products while protecting forests and others. critical ecosystems. Days later, forty-five UK-led governments pledged urgent action and investment to protect nature and shift to more sustainable modes of farming at COP26 Nature and Land-Use Day. But how exactly is such rhetoric going to turn into action?

Private finance has a role to play because by redirecting capital, financial institutions can play a crucial role in the global transition to a nature-friendly economy. Through Race to Zero, more than 30 financial institutions with more than $ 8.7 trillion in assets under management (AUM) have committed to work on eliminate the risks of deforestation linked to agricultural raw materials in their investment and loan portfolios by 2025. Thanks to the Innovative Financing Initiative for the Amazon, Cerrado and Chaco (IFACC), eight other financial institutions and agri-food companies have announced a commitment of 3 billion – with more than $ 200 million in disbursements by 2022 – to deforestation and land conversion free soybean and livestock production in South America. There are, however, significant obstacles to building a more sustainable agricultural system.

There is a lack of positive incentives to encourage sustainable agricultural practices, which is evidenced by the fact that over the past decade around 40 times more funding has been spent on land use practices. destructive rather than forest protection, conservation and sustainable agriculture combined. There are other challenges related to market leakage, lack of transparency and traceability, sensitivity to food prices and affordability and, of course, market concentration and dynamics. of power between the actors of the world market.

The problem with commitments to deforestation or sustainable land use is that if the structure of the economic system is geared towards exploiting resources on a purely short-term financial basis, it can be difficult for policy makers. to successfully implement effective change or for financiers to use their money effectively. The Food and Land Use Coalition (FOLU) has estimated that while the world’s 500 largest companies spend less than 0.1% of their total revenues and less than 1.5% of their total profits on large-scale investments in the nature per year, that would suffice. to save the forests on which all life on earth depends. It could be that the structure of the market itself and its disaggregation are the biggest obstacles – making the net zero engagement of ten major agricultural commodity players a potential change.

Net zero liabilities can be a problem, as we have seen at the country and company level. Questions abound regarding the timing, the baseline, the extent to which the offsets will be used. As different sectors become aware of the social and economic challenge of climate change and commit to reducing their emissions, it will become more and more important to transparently understand which companies are taking effective action, which speak a good line while not doing so. not doing much. and who still ignore market signals.

In the energy sector, for example, according to the latest evaluation of the Transition Pathway Initiative (TPI), only one in ten 1 in 10 of the largest energy companies is aligned on a path of 1.5 ° C in 2050, out of 140 assessed by TPI. Only three oil and gas companies, TotalEnergies, Occidental Petroleum and Eni are aligned with 1.5 ° C. The majority, at 57%, have not aligned with any of TPI’s temperature benchmarks, including one reflecting the new benchmark of national commitments – 66% are not even aligned with the Paris Agreement.

So what we need to see in the agricultural sector is clear action that will better understand where emissions and resource dependencies occur, and the most effective ways to address them. One of the challenges that many net zero commitments face is the overwhelming importance (and lack of understanding) of the supply chain, or Scope 3 emissions. Yet a company’s Scope 3 emissions are those of scope 1 or 2 of another company – the important thing is to create understanding, alignment and action. This is the potential offered by the commitment of large commodity companies to the 1.5 ° C path, with plans to create a sectoral path by COP27 in Egypt.

The ten companies that came together – ADM, Amaggi, Bunge, Cargill, Golden Agri-Resources, JBS, Louis Dreyfus Company, Olam, Wilmar and Viterra – handle large volumes of global trade in key agricultural commodities, including more than half of soybean exports and the global palm oil trade, both known to be major drivers of deforestation.

When governments, businesses, civil society, philanthropy, science and innovation come together, it can create unprecedented change. Global commitments to deforestation will lead to systemic changes in finance, trade in agricultural priorities, and the rights of local communities and indigenous peoples. But it is by leveraging the actions of companies on the ground and encouraging collaboration between supply chains and even between competitors that we can build a more sustainable path into the future.

Policies to realign capital, price emissions and promote a net zero agenda are needed to provide the framework and certainty for private sector action. Yet over the past two years, several sectors have overtaken countries in terms of understanding the challenges and willingness to meet them. New action agreements, aligned with 1.5 ° C and science with clear delivery times, could signal the start of the transition of the global agricultural market – a market as comprehensive and disruptive as the one to which the energy is facing today.


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Serbian anti-mine activists block bridges and roads | Environment News https://nflandtrust.org/serbian-anti-mine-activists-block-bridges-and-roads-environment-news/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 19:39:57 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/serbian-anti-mine-activists-block-bridges-and-roads-environment-news/ Environmental groups are angry at a recent referendum reform and oppose a new expropriation law, which allows the acquisition of private land. Skirmishes have erupted in Serbia between police and demonstrators who have blocked roads and bridges to protest new laws which they say favor the interests of foreign investors and harm the environment. The […]]]>

Environmental groups are angry at a recent referendum reform and oppose a new expropriation law, which allows the acquisition of private land.

Skirmishes have erupted in Serbia between police and demonstrators who have blocked roads and bridges to protest new laws which they say favor the interests of foreign investors and harm the environment.

The government has offered mineral resources to companies such as Chinese copper miner Zijin and Rio Tinto, but activists say the projects will pollute land and water.

Hundreds of people appeared simultaneously in the capital, Belgrade, the northern city of Novi Sad, and other places on Saturday to block major bridges and roads for an hour in what organizers described as a warning blockade. They promised further protests if the laws on expropriation of property and the referendum were not withdrawn.

Environmental groups and civil society organizations are angry at a recent referendum reform, which they say will effectively end popular initiatives against polluting projects by setting high administrative costs. They also oppose a new expropriation law, which allows the compulsory acquisition of private land by the state within eight days.

Activists argue that the measures will pave the way for foreign companies to bypass popular discontent over projects such as Rio Tinto’s offer to launch a lithium mine in western Serbia.

“I’m angry because we are an occupied country… I don’t know why [other] people are silent, ”said Marija Popovic, 35, a protester in Belgrade.

Police try to stop groups of environmental protesters from blocking Belgrade’s main road [Andrej Isakovic/ AFP]

Serbian authorities have dismissed the charges, saying the new laws are needed because of the infrastructure projects. President Aleksandar Vucic has declared that a referendum will be held on the Rio Tinto mine.

Experts have warned that the planned lithium mine will destroy farmland and pollute water.

Rio Tinto said it will adhere to all national and European environmental standards at the site. It plans to invest $ 2.4 billion in the project, according to Vesna Prodanovic, director of Rio Sava, Rio Tinto’s sister company in Serbia.

After decades of neglect, Serbia has faced major environmental problems such as air and water pollution, poor waste management and other problems.

Serbia is a candidate country for EU membership, but little progress has been made so far in improving the country’s environmental situation.

Serbia is a candidate country for EU membership, but little progress has been made so far in improving the country’s environmental situation [Andrej Isakovic/ AFP]


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Sukin and Trees For The Future join forces to tackle the humanitarian and environmental toll of deforestation https://nflandtrust.org/sukin-and-trees-for-the-future-join-forces-to-tackle-the-humanitarian-and-environmental-toll-of-deforestation/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 21:21:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/sukin-and-trees-for-the-future-join-forces-to-tackle-the-humanitarian-and-environmental-toll-of-deforestation/ PETALUMA, California., 22 November 2021 / PRNewswire / – Sukin North America, a division of the beloved Australian brand of vegan, cruelty-free and cruelty-free natural products for skin, body and hair, partners with a world-renowned philanthropic environmental organization, Trees For The Future, to help provide sustainable solutions to deforestation and climate change by working with […]]]>

PETALUMA, California., 22 November 2021 / PRNewswire / – Sukin North America, a division of the beloved Australian brand of vegan, cruelty-free and cruelty-free natural products for skin, body and hair, partners with a world-renowned philanthropic environmental organization, Trees For The Future, to help provide sustainable solutions to deforestation and climate change by working with thousands of farming families in nine countries in Africa to create and maintain successful regenerative farms. Inspired by the ageless landscapes of Australia, Sukin products contain indigenous Australian ingredients such as Kakadu plum, Quandong and rose hips, and the brand prides itself on its efforts to protect our natural resources. After a first donation of 40,000 trees, Sukin is delighted to expand its collaboration with Trees For The Future by pledging a total of 240,000 trees over the next 4 years.

Trees for the future

From the 25 november, for each order placed on the brand’s American website, SukinNaturals.com, and Canadian website, SukinNaturals.ca, Sukin will donate a tree to Trees For The Future.

This exciting partnership grew out of Sukin’s core belief that whatever we need to nourish our bodies can be found in nature, so we must do everything in our power to protect and maintain our natural resources. Through long-term, high-impact environmental solutions like the work of Trees For Our Future, Sukin believes we can create substantial change for our people and our planet.

The urgent need to compensate for the harmful effects of deforestation

Deforestation is endemic across the world and is one of the main human-made contributors to climate change. When trees are felled or burned, they release their stored carbon dioxide into the air; now that these trees are gone, there are fewer trees to absorb the increase in C02. According to Climate Institute, it is estimated that 25% of total global greenhouse gas production comes from deforestation.

Our planet is losing the astonishing value of 50 forest football fields every minute. Much of this deforestation occurs in the developing tropics of Africa, Latin America, and South and South East Asia where millions of chronically hungry farming families unwittingly use short-sighted and destructive farming tactics. This can further degrade the trees, soil, water and biodiversity of their communities, further contributing to climate change.

The monumental and eternal impact of Tree For The Future

Sukin chose to partner with Trees For The Future for its unwavering commitment to end hunger and poverty and offset the damaging effects of deforestation by training farmers to regenerate their land. With over 30 years of working in the fields, Trees For The Future has so far planted 211 million trees in dozens of countries, revitalizing over 30,000 acres of soil while improving the lives of hundreds of thousands of families. poor.

Their 4-year forest garden program provides farmers with the tools, tree seedlings and other biodegradable materials to start their farms. Farmers plant thousands of trees that protect and bring nutrients back to the soil, allowing them to grow a variety of fruits and vegetables. From there, Trees For The Future mentors farmers to develop regenerative farming practices that will keep their land and surrounding community healthy and prosperous. During this relatively short period, families in the community gain food security, farmers are able to provide for their families, and farms encourage long-term soil and ecosystem biodiversity.

Through this incredibly meaningful and ongoing partnership with Trees For The Future, Sukin is proud to contribute to a better world for all.

ABOUT BWX: BWX is a global natural beauty company with a portfolio of leading natural brands in Australia, United States, Canada, UK, China, and select other international markets. Founded and based in Australia, BWX’s expertise lies in innovation, product development, manufacturing and marketing of natural products. BWX’s family of natural brands provide consumers with a natural choice for personal care without compromising performance. BWX inspires the advancement of plant and mineral based science without causing unnecessary harm to the planet. He also says NO to testing his products on animals and believes in donating. The company is actively involved in giving back to causes related to the environment, social responsibility and the empowerment of women.

About the trees of the future: Trees for the Future is a 501 (c) (3) registered nonprofit that trains smallholder farmers in sustainable agroforestry systems to end hunger, poverty and environmental degradation. “It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the state of our planet and the need for urgent action,” says Brandy Lellou, program director for Trees for the Future. “But the good news is that Trees for the Future has a solution to some of our most pressing challenges and we have branded partners like Sukin who are dedicated to making lasting change possible.”

For more information
Tractenberg & Co.
Dana kaynes | dtuchman@tractenberg.com
Emilie Lanzillo | elanzillo@tractenberg.com

Sukin

Sukin

Cision

Cision

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sukin-and-trees-for-the-future-join-forces-to-fight-the-humanitarian-and-environmental-toll-of-deforestation-301430291. html

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Business Award for LSU AgCenter Researcher, Tulane Lakeside Hospital | Business https://nflandtrust.org/business-award-for-lsu-agcenter-researcher-tulane-lakeside-hospital-business/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 06:15:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/business-award-for-lsu-agcenter-researcher-tulane-lakeside-hospital-business/ LSU AgCenter Researcher Terrence R. Tiersch, Director of the Center for Genetic Resources and Aquatic Genetic Material at the School of Renewable Natural Resources, has been reappointed as Chairman of the National Advisory Board on Genetic Resources of the United States Department of Agriculture. The board provides feedback to the secretary of agriculture and to […]]]>

LSU AgCenter Researcher Terrence R. Tiersch, Director of the Center for Genetic Resources and Aquatic Genetic Material at the School of Renewable Natural Resources, has been reappointed as Chairman of the National Advisory Board on Genetic Resources of the United States Department of Agriculture.

The board provides feedback to the secretary of agriculture and to the colleges and universities that allocate land on food and agriculture research, education, extension and economics priorities and policies . The advisory board also provides reports and recommendations to the appropriate agricultural committees of Congress.

Tiersch has chaired the board since 2018.

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Rachelle sanderson, Regional Watershed Coordinator for Region 7 of the Louisiana Watershed Initiative for the Capital Region Planning Commission, was named the 2021 recipient of the Ivan A. Johnson Award for Young Professionals by the American Water Resources Association.

The award recognizes and encourages young professionals as future leaders in water resources research, management and education. It is awarded annually to a young professional who has demonstrated outstanding achievement, talent and leadership potential in their professional activities related to water resources.

Sanderson started as Watershed Coordinator for Region 7 in May 2020. She works with communities to integrate local perspectives into planning efforts while increasing capacity and knowledge of challenges and opportunities that increase risk. flood.

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Oracle lighting won the 2021 Manufacturer of the Year award from SEMA.

The SEMA Industry Awards recognize outstanding contributions to the specialty equipment industry.

Oracle Lighting, based in Metairie, has been providing lighting products and technologies for the automotive, powersports, motorcycle and marine markets since 1999.

Tulane Lakeside Hospital in Metairie received its seventh consecutive A rating from The Leapfrog Group, an independent hospital quality watchdog.

The designation recognizes Tulane Lakeside’s long-standing efforts to protect patients from errors, injuries, accidents and infections.

The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade grades all general hospitals across the country every six months and is the only assessment program based exclusively on preventing medical errors and other harm to the patients they care for.


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Oetting Homestead Farms wins conservation award https://nflandtrust.org/oetting-homestead-farms-wins-conservation-award/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:23:36 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/oetting-homestead-farms-wins-conservation-award/ The Missouri Léopold Conservation Award 2021 went to Oetting Homestead Farms in Lafayette County for their commitment to habitat management. The annual award is presented by the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, the American Farmland Trust, the Missouri Farmers Care Foundation, the Sand County Foundation, and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). It was awarded […]]]>

The Missouri Léopold Conservation Award 2021 went to Oetting Homestead Farms in Lafayette County for their commitment to habitat management.

The annual award is presented by the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, the American Farmland Trust, the Missouri Farmers Care Foundation, the Sand County Foundation, and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). It was awarded to the Oettings on Thursday at the Missouri governor’s conference on agriculture in Osage Beach.

“The Oetting family has demonstrated the long-term commitment needed to consistently build and protect their land, enabling this fifth and sixth generation farming family to continue to make a living growing food for America,” said Scott Edwards, State Curator of the NRCS. “Being intentional in implementing conservation and investment practices in the future makes this farm a great example of the many good things that happen in Missouri agriculture. “

Steve and Sharon Oetting raise over 3,000 pigs a year and grow wheat, corn and soybeans. Their efforts to mitigate soil erosion, maintain water and air quality, and protect wildlife earned their farm one of the first certifications in the Department of Agriculture’s farm stewardship program.

The Oetting use all available land to cultivate no-till corn and soybeans to prevent soil erosion and use a three-lagoon system connected to a small lake, eliminating the need to purchase more land. one million gallons of fresh water per year. The system also allows them to water livestock and recycle lagoon resources to fertilize their crops.

“In agriculture our greatest resource is the land, and as farmers it is our duty to be good stewards of this land for future generations,” said Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council President Kyle Durham. “Sustainability is a top priority for the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council, and it’s amazing to see the spotlight on the Oetting family’s management example. “

The Leopold Conservation Award program – named after famed environmentalist Aldo Leopold – is supported by a myriad of farm groups, including the Missouri Soybean Association, the Missouri Association of Electric Cooperatives, the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and the Missouri Corn Merchandising Council.


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Police say uncle killed niece and man in Sacramento shooting https://nflandtrust.org/police-say-uncle-killed-niece-and-man-in-sacramento-shooting/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 01:25:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/police-say-uncle-killed-niece-and-man-in-sacramento-shooting/ The Sacramento Police Department said it arrested a 22-year-old man after he shot his 7-year-old niece and another man. The Sacramento County Coroner’s Office identified the girl as Isabel Agnes Delgadillo Martin. She would have been 8 years old on November 22. Tyrice Martin was held in the Sacramento County Main Jail for homicide, police […]]]>

The Sacramento Police Department said it arrested a 22-year-old man after he shot his 7-year-old niece and another man. The Sacramento County Coroner’s Office identified the girl as Isabel Agnes Delgadillo Martin. She would have been 8 years old on November 22. Tyrice Martin was held in the Sacramento County Main Jail for homicide, police said. Officers believe there are no other suspects at this time. The shooting took place at 10:20 p.m. along Seavey Circle near the Upper Land Park area, the Sacramento Police Department said. The man died at the scene and the girl was rushed to hospital where she later died. Investigators focused much of their attention on a parking lot along Seavey Circle where they were seen photographing several cars and evidence markers spread over a large area. According to the police. the circumstances that led to the shooting are still under investigation and they have no suspicious information to disclose. The identity of the victims and their relationship will be released by the coroner’s office once their inquest is completed. The Sacramento City Unified School District confirmed the girl was a student in the neighborhood. Sacramento board member Katie Valenzuela and a group of community leaders asked for more resources from community organizations on Tuesday afternoon. Valenzuela, who represents the Seavey Circle, said that “we need to have a calculation a city on what we do and don’t do to support the community, to tackle community violence in a really meaningful way, to invest in prevention. She and other speakers called for more money to be allocated to community groups that are “already doing the work,” saying funding community organizations has been a struggle, especially when compared to the resources that go to the police. Chet Hewitt, president and CEO of the Sierra Health Foundation and chairman of the Black Child Legacy Campaign, said gun violence is up 30% nationwide and Sacramento is no exception. “No city is a big city if it can’t take care of its children,” he said. Derrell Roberts, co-founder of the Roberts Family Development Center, asked for funding for more mentors and tutors to children., “he said. “It would mean more mental health services for adults and children to solve some of their problems. These would be intervention strategies that tackle the problem posed. “He called on Mayor Darrell Steinberg and the entire city council to work together to invest in the neighborhoods of Sacramento.” East Sacramento, Land Park should not to be the only safe neighborhoods in this city, ”he said.

The Sacramento Police Department said it arrested a 22-year-old man after he shot his 7-year-old niece and another man.

The Sacramento County Coroner’s Office identified the girl as Isabel Agnes Delgadillo Martin. She would have been 8 years old on November 22.

Tyrice Martin was held in the Sacramento County Main Jail for homicide, police said. Officers believe there are no other suspects at this time.

The shooting took place at 10:20 p.m. along Seavey Circle near the Upper Land Park area, the Sacramento Police Department said. The man died at the scene and the girl was rushed to hospital where she later died.

Investigators focused much of their attention on a parking lot along Seavey Circle where they were seen photographing several cars and evidence markers spread over a large area.

Police said the circumstances leading up to the shooting were still under investigation and that they had no suspicious information to disclose.

The identity of the victims and their relationship will be released by the coroner’s office once their inquest is completed.

The Sacramento City Unified School District confirmed the girl was a student in the district.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

Sacramento board member Katie Valenzuela and a group of community leaders called on Tuesday afternoon for more resources for community organizations from city hall.

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Valenzuela, who represents Seavey Circle, said that “we need to have an account as a city on what we have done and are not doing to support the community, to tackle community violence in a really meaningful way, to invest in prevention.

She and other speakers called for more money to be allocated to community groups that are “already doing the work,” saying funding community organizations has been a struggle, especially when compared to the resources that go to the police.

Chet Hewitt, president and CEO of the Sierra Health Foundation and chairman of the Black Child Legacy Campaign, said gun violence had increased by 30% across the country and Sacramento was no exception.

“No city is a big city if it can’t take care of its children,” he said.

Derrell Roberts, co-founder of the Roberts Family Development Center, has asked for funding for more mentors and tutors for children.

“More services preventing our children from being in a situation where they are victims of violence,” he said. “It would mean more mental health services for adults and children to solve some of their problems. These would be intervention strategies that tackle the problem opposite. “

He called on Mayor Darrell Steinberg and the entire city council to work together to invest in Sacramento neighborhoods.

“East Sacramento, Land Park shouldn’t be the only safe areas in this city,” he said.



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Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources hires workers https://nflandtrust.org/ministry-of-lands-and-natural-resources-hires-workers/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 07:10:13 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/ministry-of-lands-and-natural-resources-hires-workers/ HONOLULU (KHON2) – The Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources is recruiting from its Resource Conservation and Application Division (DOCARE) as well as for the Kupu ‘Āina Corps program. DLNR is looking for entry-level resource conservation and enforcement officers. Get the latest Hawaii morning news delivered to your inbox, sign up for News 2 You […]]]>

HONOLULU (KHON2) – The Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources is recruiting from its Resource Conservation and Application Division (DOCARE) as well as for the Kupu ‘Āina Corps program.

DLNR is looking for entry-level resource conservation and enforcement officers.

Get the latest Hawaii morning news delivered to your inbox, sign up for News 2 You

Duties include inspecting fishermen’s catches, checking game caught in public hunting areas, patrolling on a jet ski, and responding to crimes in state parks and small craft harbors.

To apply, go to the state employment site Jobs.hawaii.gov/careers December 4.
If you are interested, submit your application as soon as possible before the close of the application period. The last time the department hired for these positions, the application period ended within hours due to the large number of applicants.

Those hired will attend the DOCARE Recruit Training Academy in Honolulu.

In addition, DLNR is also hiring 130 full-time and part-time workers for the Kupu ‘Āina body program.

Those hired will work in natural resource management, agriculture, conservation, renewable energy or other professions related to sustainable development.

Applications are accepted from Tuesday November 16 at https://www.kupuhawaii.org/aina/
The deadline for submitting applications for the first round is Monday, December 10, 2021.

The goal of these jobs is to help those who have been affected by the pandemic to gain employment in the environmental sustainability industry. Sustainability organizations are also encouraged to serve as a host site.

Anyone 17 and older will be considered, but Kupu said workers between the ages of 20 and 40 are the group identified in the legislation funding the program.

Interested in jewelry heists gone wrong, other weird news? Discover the weird news

The money comes from $ 5 million in federal funding from the American Rescue Plan Act, which was legislated for this use in Hawaii.


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How to report a problematic house in Akron https://nflandtrust.org/how-to-report-a-problematic-house-in-akron/ https://nflandtrust.org/how-to-report-a-problematic-house-in-akron/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 11:08:16 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/how-to-report-a-problematic-house-in-akron/ When it comes to housing complaints in Akron, residents usually have two options: go to the city’s 311 call center or go to the police. The two have different ways of getting homeowners to comply with the rules, either through education or by touching their wallets. Criminal activity should be directed against the police, while […]]]>

When it comes to housing complaints in Akron, residents usually have two options: go to the city’s 311 call center or go to the police.

The two have different ways of getting homeowners to comply with the rules, either through education or by touching their wallets.

Criminal activity should be directed against the police, while housing code issues, such as tall grass or garbage in the yard, should be reported to 311. Residents should only call 911 in the event of a problem. ’emergency.

City spokeswoman Ellen Lander Nischt said the best way for residents to file complaints about a nearby house or residence is to use 311.

To report, dial 311 or 330-375-2311. People can also go online and submit complaints to akronohio.gov/311, where they can track the status of their complaints.


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Yard Theater variety show ‘No Man’s Land’ puts women in the spotlight https://nflandtrust.org/yard-theater-variety-show-no-mans-land-puts-women-in-the-spotlight/ https://nflandtrust.org/yard-theater-variety-show-no-mans-land-puts-women-in-the-spotlight/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 21:00:31 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/yard-theater-variety-show-no-mans-land-puts-women-in-the-spotlight/ In February 2020, the magician Krystyn Lambert walked behind the scenes of the the follies of brookledge – an intimate, invitation-only variety show tucked away behind a mansion in Los Angeles’ Hancock Park, where she was performing that night. Then she spotted Pam Severns, a fellow performer in the variety arts who is renowned for […]]]>

In February 2020, the magician Krystyn Lambert walked behind the scenes of the the follies of brookledge – an intimate, invitation-only variety show tucked away behind a mansion in Los Angeles’ Hancock Park, where she was performing that night. Then she spotted Pam Severns, a fellow performer in the variety arts who is renowned for her unorthodox approach to classical puppetry and who works with Jim Henson Co. Lambert, a Magic Castle Junior alumnus, was planning to put in shadow puppets work on his stage. act at the time. Intrigued to learn more about the art of puppetry, she walked over to Severns and said hello. The two became quick friends, and Severns shared resources and puppet advice with Lambert.

The conversation quickly turned to the lack of support and representation for non-male variety performers. “We were complaining that so many of these variety shows, comedy shows – certainly magic shows – are all dominated by cis, straight, white men,” Lambert said. While there are a multitude of Los Angeles-based artists in these fields who identify as women, “they rarely get the stage time they deserve,” Lambert adds.

A glance at upcoming performances at Magic Castle, for example, doesn’t exactly inspire the certainty that diversity and inclusiveness is a priority for all guests. At the moment, no women of color appear to be performing there, and only one magician booked for a show is a woman, LA-based Kayla Drescher. As one of the city’s most renowned institutions for magic and the variety arts, the Magic Castle has been plagued by a following count a 2020 Times investigation detailing the charges that venue staff, management, academy members and performers have perpetuated abuse, including sexual assault and discrimination based on race or gender. (Chief Executive Joseph Furlow resigned amid the controversy.) The article also cited a 2019 study finding that less than 12% of the organization was made up of women, and members said the vast majority of magicians within the castle academy itself were white.

Tired of watching venues honor increased representation in show schedules, and galvanized by the immense creativity that is gathering around LA, Lambert and Severns have decided to create a new variety show called “No Man’s Land”, debuting at the court theater Wednesday November 10. Lambert describes it as “a more modern take on the more traditional variety arts” which will feature artists such as juggler Tristan Cunningham, ventriloquist Hannah Leskosky, circus artist Dallys Newton and actress Cara Connors – who are all women – identify talents.

The goal of “No Man’s Land”, as Severns puts it, is “to normalize predominantly female programming”. While Severns notes that awareness of the problem is growing, she still doesn’t see much action being taken to truly diversify a series of industries historically dominated by white males. “I always see all-male queues at Magic Castle. … It’s hard to say, but it doesn’t look like things are changing much, ”adds Severns. Members of the comedy community have attempted to bring this problem to light, “but comedy is a bigger industry than juggling or ventriloquism,” says Lambert. “And so, in some of the less populated variety arts, there is a lot more ground to cover.”

Women have been inseparable from the variety arts since humans first discovered the fear that accompanies a knack or pulling a rabbit out of a top hat. But they are rarely celebrated in its history. For generations, most magical women were objectified or confined to secondary roles. At the end of the 18th and 19th centuries, many talented women in magic worked on the vaudeville circuit, some as assistants.

As historian of magic Margaret Steele highlighted, the assistants were skilled magicians who played a vital role in ensuring that the act was possible. “It’s built into the art, the way the wizard and the wizard interact,” Steele told History, adding, “The helplessness of the wizard [is] in fact just a ruse ”, a bet which reinforces the scale of the smoke and the mirrors. The magician Adelaide Herrmann – known as the “Queen of Magic” – captivated audiences around the world in the late 1800s and early 1900s with feats such as shooting from a cannon, and one that involved she is locked in a coffin, draped in a sheet doused with alcohol, then set on fire.

But even now renowned magicians like Herrmann are rarely mentioned in the same breath as, say, Harry Houdini or Penn & Teller. In addition to struggling for recognition, women in the variety arts are constantly faced with disrespect and disbelief that they can command a stage. Once, while preparing for her act, Lambert recalls that a theater manager immediately assumed that Lambert’s boyfriend was the magician and that she was the assistant – in fact, it was the other way around. . “It’s this unwelcoming environment that we try to fight against,” Lambert says.

Severns and Lambert will host Wednesday’s show, and they hope to continue “No Man’s Land” on a monthly basis. Organizers say a performance in December featuring a range of drag comedians and other luminaries has been confirmed for now – and has all the makings of a magical evening.

“No Man’s Land: an evening of comedy, magic and variety”

Wednesday November 10

The Yard Theater, 4319 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles

Tickets: $ 15

theyardtheater.com


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