Land Resources – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 18:23:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nflandtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-138x136.png Land Resources – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ 32 32 Colombia’s new president pledges to protect the rainforest | Economic news https://nflandtrust.org/colombias-new-president-pledges-to-protect-the-rainforest-economic-news/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 18:23:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/colombias-new-president-pledges-to-protect-the-rainforest-economic-news/ RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Gustavo Petro, Colombia’s first elected leftist president, will take office in August with ambitious proposals to halt record rates of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. Petro has promised to limit the expansion of agribusiness into the forest and create reserves where indigenous and other communities are allowed to harvest rubber, […]]]>

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Gustavo Petro, Colombia’s first elected leftist president, will take office in August with ambitious proposals to halt record rates of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. Petro has promised to limit the expansion of agribusiness into the forest and create reserves where indigenous and other communities are allowed to harvest rubber, acai and other non-timber forest products. He also promised revenue from carbon credits to fund the replanting.

“From Colombia, we will give humanity a reward, a remedy, a solution: to stop burning the Amazon rainforest, to recover it to its natural border, to give humanity the possibility of living on this planet”, Petro, dressed in an indigenous headdress, told a crowd in the Amazon town of Leticia during his campaign.

But to do so, he must first establish rule over large lawless areas.

The task of stopping deforestation seems more difficult than ever. In 2021, the Colombian Amazon lost 98,000 hectares (over 240,000 acres) of virgin forest to deforestation and a further 9,000 hectares (22,000 acres) to fire. Both were down from 2020, but 2021 was still the fourth worst year on record according to Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), an initiative of the nonprofit Amazon Conservation Association.

Political cartoons about world leaders

political cartoons

More than 40% of Colombia is in the Amazon, an area roughly the size of Spain. The country has the highest bird biodiversity in the world, mainly because it includes transition zones between the Andes mountains and the Amazon lowlands. Fifteen percent of the Colombian Amazon has already been deforested, according to the Foundation for Conservation and Sustainable Development, or FCDS.

Forest destruction has been on the rise since 2016, the year Colombia signed a peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, that ended decades of bloody armed conflict.

“The peace process has allowed people to return to rural areas once plagued by conflict. As the returning population increasingly used natural resources, it contributed to deforestation and increased forest fires, particularly in the Amazon and the Andes-Amazon transition regions,” according to a new article from the journal “Environmental Science and Policy”.

The presence of the state is barely felt in the Colombian Amazon. “Once the armed groups were demobilized, they left the forest free for cattle ranching, illegal mining and drug trafficking,” said Ruth Consuelo Chaparro, director of the Roads to Identity Foundation, during a telephone interview. “The state has not filled the gaps.”

The main driver of deforestation has been the expansion of cattle ranching. Since 2016, the number of cattle in the Amazon has doubled to 2.2 million. During the same period, about 500,000 hectares (1.2 million acres) of forest have been lost, according to FCDS, based on official data.

This livestock expansion goes hand in hand with illegally seized land, said FCDS director Rodrigo Botero. “The big business deal is land. The cows are just a way to take over these territories,” he told the AP in a phone interview.

Experts say illegally seized land is often sold back to ranchers, who then raise their cattle without land use restrictions, such as size of ownership.

Most of the destruction is occurring in an “arc of deforestation” in the northwest of the Colombian Amazon, where even protected areas have not been spared. Chiribiquete, the world’s largest national park protecting a tropical rainforest, has lost about 6,000 hectares (14,800 acres) since 2018, according to MAAP.

During the campaign, Botero took Petro and other presidential candidates on separate day trips to the Amazon. They flew over cattle ranching areas, national parks and indigenous territories.

“One very interesting thing that Petro and other candidates have said is that they never imagined the scale of the destruction.” The sense of ungovernability made a deep impression on each of them, Botero said.

According to the World Resources Institute, almost 60% of Colombia’s greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture, deforestation and other land uses. In 2020, as part of the Paris Agreement, the government of Colombian President Ivan Duque pledged to reduce its emissions by 51% by 2030. To do this, it pledged to achieve net deforestation zero by 2030.

The Amazon is the largest tropical rainforest in the world and a huge carbon sink. It is feared that its destruction will not only release huge amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, further complicating hopes of stopping climate change, but will also push it beyond a tipping point after which a large part of the forest will begin an irreversible process of tropical forest degradation. savannah.

Although it holds almost half of the national territory, the Amazon is the least populated part of Colombia, so historically that it is neglected during presidential campaigns.

This year’s campaign did not completely deviate from this. But this year, for the first time, there was a televised presidential debate devoted solely to environmental issues before the first round of the election. Petro, then leading the polls, declined to participate.

In his government program, Petro further promises to prioritize collective land titles, such as indigenous reserves and areas for landless farmers. He also promises to control migration to the Amazon, to fight against illegal activities, such as land confiscations, drug trafficking and money laundering through land purchases.

Petro’s press officer did not respond to requests for comment.

“Petro has studied and understands deforestation,” said Consuelo Chaparro, whose organization works with indigenous tribes in the Amazon. But the president alone cannot do anything, she said. She hopes he will listen and get things done. “We don’t expect him to be a Messiah.”

The Associated Press’s climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. Learn more about AP’s climate initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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What if India was the China of today? | by Vidushi | June 2022 https://nflandtrust.org/what-if-india-was-the-china-of-today-by-vidushi-june-2022/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 11:11:41 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/what-if-india-was-the-china-of-today-by-vidushi-june-2022/ What if India’s PMF was agriculture, not industry? Farmer plowing the land | Taken from iStockphoto.com IIndia and China – These two names come up regularly in the news, often in connection with each other. Often at odds with each other over border disputes, these neighboring countries have many similarities in their history. For example, […]]]>

What if India’s PMF was agriculture, not industry?

Farmer plowing the land | Taken from iStockphoto.com

IIIndia and China – These two names come up regularly in the news, often in connection with each other. Often at odds with each other over border disputes, these neighboring countries have many similarities in their history. For example, the two countries were at one time home to two of the oldest civilizations in the ancient world. Extremely rich in natural resources, these two countries have always been the favorites of traders and colonialists.

Apart from this, India and China gained political independence around the same time in the late 1940s, with their demographics at the time comprising mostly farmers and farmers. During the same period, both of their industries were severely underdeveloped and the vast majority of their citizens were unemployed. Also, after independence, the rulers of both countries preferred non-capitalist forms of economic systems for their countries, viz. socialism and communism, on a configuration of laissez-faire.

However, despite so many similarities in their histories, the pace at which the two countries grew after independence couldn’t be more different. While India’s GDP growth rate in 1994 was 6.4%, China’s was 13%. Another example that highlights the differences is the fact that in 2010, when India held a 2.7% share of global manufacturing output, China was already the the largest manufacturer in the worldwith a part of 19.3%.

But what is the reason for their contrasting growth rates? Experts believe that the main reason for this difference was that China chose agriculture as its main driving force (PMF), while India chose industry. This decision alone by their respective leaders is touted as the main reason why China is now a $14.7 trillion economy, while India lags behind, with a GDP relatively below $2. $66 trillion.

An avid alternative history reader, today I will try to paint a picture of the growth and progress that the Indian economy might have had, if they had chosen agriculture as their MFP and not industry.

The country’s limited capital would have been directed to agriculture, which was a low-investment activity, rather than high-investment industries like steel and thermal power plants. The money could have been used to create several small self-sufficient factories that would produce agricultural products. tools needed for farming. All the surplus labor would be trained to work in these factories, which would create jobs and also build the base of industries in the future. In this way, India would have to take much smaller loans from international financial institutions, which would significantly reduce its debts and improve its balance of payments from the beginning.

By abolishing high taxation systems like the “Zamindari system”, taking stock of agricultural resources and mobilizing farmers at the lowest levels, that is. the villagers, the government would facilitate the financial independence of the villagers much earlier. Their families’ excess income and savings would be saved in the banks, thereby increasing the money in the market.

The Panchayat system that’s to say. a three-tier system of village local self-government in rural India, was reportedly established as a priority, accepting the recommendations of the Balwant Rai Mehta Committee for the same, in 1957. This decentralization, which was finally achieved in 1992 after years of stalling, would have resulted in access to health, security and housing for all Indians nearly four decades earlier.

Cooperatives and agricultural finance institutions would be established as a priority, giving farmers access to cheap loans at low interest rates. Prompt crop insurance and fertilizer subsidies would further incentivize farmers to expand their operations. Promoting organic farming and using local and sustainable fertilizers such as cow dung, which was already widely used, would further reduce ancillary costs, further benefiting farmers.

An early focus on agriculture would have reduced poverty across the country. The poorer sections of Indian society, ie. the farmers would have been the first to have an income and a means of subsistence. This would guarantee them a good standard of living in the villages thanks to which fewer workers would migrate to the cities in search of work. This would significantly reduce the pressure on urban jobs and land resources, and a better and more balanced quality of life would be achieved for all.

By opening up the economy earlier and trading with foreign countries, India is said to have achieved the dual goals of improving trade relations and preventing the balance of payments (BOP) crisis it faced at the end. of the 1980s.

To avoid a collapse of its economy during the balance of payments crisis, India had to radically change its foreign policy and devalue its currency, in accordance with the directives of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). This could have been avoided if India had started trading earlier, using surplus agricultural products. The money thus earned could have been used to import machinery and all other equipment which would compel India to build great industries.

After securing financial stability and the well-being of its people by using agriculture as an MFP, India could have focused on industrialization and continued to grow. China practiced this switch of PMF from agriculture to industry in the early 1980s, and after realizing that its industries were not developing, India also did the same. However, this was done in 2003, decades after China.

Despite what seems like an overwhelming number of reasons to choose agriculture over manufacturing for its MFP, India has chosen manufacturing. Experts believe the reasons are:

  1. During the period following World War II, defense and security were a priority over everything else for nations around the world. At that time, building a solid industrial base for a robust defense system was a priority for countries around the world.
  2. It was believed that industrialization was the fastest way to achieve high growthand has been highlighted by the World Bank and the IMF.
  3. Countries that chose agriculture as their MFP were considered asby the World Bank and the IMF. This perspective changed significantly in the 1980s, after economists observed China’s phenomenal growth using agriculture as an MFP.

Starting from the past, it is important to remember that the purpose of analyzing history is to learn from it, not to dwell on it or blame people for it. Although the ideal situation would have been for India to also start with agriculture as an MFP and then move on to manufacturing, this was not to be the case. India’s rulers learned from the mistakes of its past and incorporated the necessary changes into their economic system. The IMF-led LPG reforms are the result.

Today, India is one of the largest economies in the world. It’s the world the biggest nation producing pulses and milk, and the second biggest steel producer. In the pharmaceutical industry (by volume), mobile market and refinery production, it ranked in the top three countries. In addition, India also has the world the biggest railway network in terms of passenger traffic, and the the biggest renewable energy expansion plan.

India is set to become “one of the biggest engines of growth in the world”, according to a report by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). In 2018 before the Covid-19 pandemic, India’s economy grew by 6.1%, while, on the other hand, the The US economy grew by 3%. Superior technology, better ease of doing business and easier FDI routes have made India a top choice for investment, and according to the Center for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), India should become the third largest economy worldwide per year 2031ranking ahead of developed countries such as Japan and the United Kingdom.

India’s Projected Growth Compared to Other Countries | Source: Trade Standard

Even during the pandemic, India has taken unprecedented steps both in terms of scale and scope. India’s national COVID-19 vaccination campaign is the the largest vaccination campaign in the world and India is about to get closer to the administration 2 billion doses of Covid vaccination in a record time. Apart from this, Mission Sagar organized by her has provided vaccines and humanitarian aid to several countries around the world. This includes over 3,000 tonnes of food, over 300 tonnes of LMOs, 900 oxygen concentrators and 20 ISO containers.

India’s sense of responsibility towards its citizens and its diaspora is reflected in the fact that all 10 best spots for the biggest warzone evacuations in the world, including the phenomenal Kuwait Airlift, are owned by India. The most recent of these is “Operation Ganga II”, the largest evacuation of the war zone between Ukraine and Russia, during which India brought 17,000 of his students stranded at home.

India’s future is bright and vibrant, with the country passing several milestones every day in the areas of defence, nuclear technology and space explorations, among others. Despite a rough start, India is showing steady growth, somewhat similar to the rise of Japan and China in the 20th century. Although India liberalized its economy several years after its neighbors in Southeast Asia, it is growing rapidly and is currently on its way to becoming one of the largest economies in the world.

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Glenville State University student receives EnerGIS grant | VM News https://nflandtrust.org/glenville-state-university-student-receives-energis-grant-vm-news/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:20:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/glenville-state-university-student-receives-energis-grant-vm-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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Tax collection, land market issues addressed by finance minister https://nflandtrust.org/tax-collection-land-market-issues-addressed-by-finance-minister/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:15:51 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/tax-collection-land-market-issues-addressed-by-finance-minister/ Finance Minister Ho Duc Phoc. Binh Thuan MP Dang Hong Sy asked Phoc about the legal documents on prevention of losses in state budget collection with respect to real estate business issued by the Ministry of Finance (MoF) and the General Tax Department. He said voters have complained that state officials in many localities are […]]]>
Finance Minister Ho Duc Phoc.

Binh Thuan MP Dang Hong Sy asked Phoc about the legal documents on prevention of losses in state budget collection with respect to real estate business issued by the Ministry of Finance (MoF) and the General Tax Department.

He said voters have complained that state officials in many localities are harassing people and causing trouble when people go through real estate transfer procedures.

Shipping circular, decree and law?

The issuance of dispatches (Document No. 14257/BTC-VP of December 15, 2021; and Document No. 438/BTC-VP of January 12, 2022) by the MOF which aims to prevent losses in the collection of the budget of the State falls under the jurisdiction of the Ministry.

However, the question is why the MOF still has to issue such documents once the regulations on tax collection in real estate transfer business are clearly stipulated in the legal framework, which already includes the tax law, the decree 12, decree 65 and circular 92.

Circular 92/2015/TT-BTC dated June 15, 2015 stipulates that when transferring real estate, transferees are subject to a 2% income tax, while transferees are subject to transfer fees. 0.5% recording. The taxable prices are indicated in the contracts.

If the prices of the real estate do not appear in the contracts, or if the prices appearing in the contracts are lower than those of the land plots fixed by the local authorities, the taxable prices will be those of the land plots fixed by the local authorities (article 17 ).

Decree 12/2012/ND-CP of February 12, 2015 also shows similar content (article 18).

The clear and specific regulations have created a reasonable legal framework that tax officials and citizens have followed for many years.

Minister Phoc said that under the Land Law, land price frameworks are set by provincial people’s committees once every five years. It is legal to use land prices, land unit prices and the coefficient to calculate taxes.

Do the dispatches issued by the ministry and the tax body have a validity superior to the law, the decree and the circulars above?

Since the day the dispatches were published, the tax authorities and relevant agencies have kept people’s records for the real estate transfer longer than before.

Local newspapers quoted GDT’s report as saying that since the beginning of the year, 85,000 real estate files have to be re-declared, while the additional tax revenue amounts to 222 billion VND. The figure is 13,100 cases in Ho Chi Minh City, 500 in Long An and 12,000 in Vung Tau.

Responding to questions from National Assembly deputies, Phoc said he had instructed the director general of the General Department of Taxation to follow the post-examination mechanism, not the pre-examination. However, since the records have been kept for so long by the agencies, people have every reason to believe that the screening is being applied.

Meanwhile, prior review has been found to be unworkable, which is contrary to the principle of state management that post review should be applied to avoid inconvenience to people.

There are many problems in the real estate market. To develop the market and collect taxes more reasonably, local authorities need to set up a framework for land prices that is closer to market prices. Under current regulations, local authorities only adjust land prices once every five years and land prices are set at low levels.

Develop a healthy market

The resolution of the 13th Party Congress points out that the property assessment does not conform to the rules of the market and does not reflect reality; land and property valuation, land transfer and land use change are not implemented in a transparent manner; while the loss of urban land resources remains high. The urban housing policy is not comprehensive and reasonable, and the development of housing products still cannot meet the needs.

Property tax collection is only 0.07% of GDP, which is 10 times lower than in developing countries and 30 times lower than the average level in OECD countries.

The Minister of Finance, with the function, the task and the rights assigned to him, must propose a modification of the regulations to carry out the orientations of the Party. If this is the case, the real estate market in particular and land resources in general will become an important resource, capitalized for the development of the country.

If state agencies only focus on tightening inspections to catch certain fraudulent cases, they can scare people away. If so, tax revenue may increase in the short term, but it is not good for the long-term healthy development of the market.

Tu Giang

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Former Yosemite chief on battling climate change wildfires https://nflandtrust.org/former-yosemite-chief-on-battling-climate-change-wildfires/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:41:55 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/former-yosemite-chief-on-battling-climate-change-wildfires/ As kids in northern Illinois, my siblings and I hardly considered collecting leaves from our yard a chore. The promise to light the pile of fire and see it blaze at the end of the day was a reward. My love of fire has remained a core value over the years, influencing my professional development, […]]]>

As kids in northern Illinois, my siblings and I hardly considered collecting leaves from our yard a chore. The promise to light the pile of fire and see it blaze at the end of the day was a reward.

My love of fire has remained a core value over the years, influencing my professional development, my education, and the land management methods I championed during my 35 years with the U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service and now at retirement, with basic forest firefighters.

Since the beginning of my career in 1984, the National Park Service has led the industry in integrating fire into land management planning. Wildfires release nutrients into the soil, promote seed germination, improve forest diversity and maintain critical habitats for wildlife.

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British Army: Russia uses anti-ship missiles on land targets https://nflandtrust.org/british-army-russia-uses-anti-ship-missiles-on-land-targets/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 07:48:06 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/british-army-russia-uses-anti-ship-missiles-on-land-targets/ A dashboard counts the number of injured people assisted and transported by a military paramedic in Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, June 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue) Bernard Armangue PA Kyiv, Ukraine Russian bombers likely launched heavy anti-ship missiles dating from the 1960s intended to destroy nuclear-armed aircraft carriers against land targets in Ukraine, a […]]]>

title=

A dashboard counts the number of injured people assisted and transported by a military paramedic in Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Tuesday, June 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

PA

Russian bombers likely launched heavy anti-ship missiles dating from the 1960s intended to destroy nuclear-armed aircraft carriers against land targets in Ukraine, a British military intelligence report said on Saturday.

He said the 5.5-ton Kh-22 missiles, when used in ground attacks with conventional warheads, are highly inaccurate and can cause severe collateral damage and casualties.

Russia probably uses such weapons because it lacks more accurate modern missiles, Britain’s Ministry of Defense said in a daily update. He gave no details on exactly where these missiles were deployed and there was no immediate confirmation from Ukrainian authorities of the use of the heavy missiles.

Both sides spent vast amounts of arms in what became a bitter war of attrition for the eastern region of coal mines and factories known as Donbas, straining their resources and stockpiles.

The area borders Russia and has been partly controlled by Moscow-backed separatists since 2014.

The UK MoD report says Ukraine’s air defenses are still deterring Russian tactical aircraft from carrying out strikes across much of the country.

Meanwhile, the Ukrainian military said Russian forces were regrouping to launch an offensive on the city of Sloviansk in Donetsk region in eastern Ukraine.

In its regular operational update, the General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine said that Moscow managed to gain a foothold overnight in the village of Bohorodychne, 24 kilometers (about 15 miles) northwest of Sloviansk, and was preparing to attack the city.

The update says the threat of missiles and airstrikes on Ukraine from Belarusian territory remains, noting that Minsk has extended military exercises along the Ukraine-Belarus border until June 18.

Elsewhere, Donetsk regional police said Russian missiles hit 13 towns and villages in the region overnight. In a statement, police said civilians were killed and injured, without specifying the number.

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Karmanau reported from Lviv, Ukraine. Associated Press writers Jill Lawless in London and Jamey Keaten in Geneva contributed.

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Follow AP’s coverage of the war in Ukraine at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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Land acquisition near Mount Taylor moves sacred sites out of private ownership and preserves habitat https://nflandtrust.org/land-acquisition-near-mount-taylor-moves-sacred-sites-out-of-private-ownership-and-preserves-habitat/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 06:05:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/land-acquisition-near-mount-taylor-moves-sacred-sites-out-of-private-ownership-and-preserves-habitat/ Sacred lands that have been cut off will once again be accessible to the public, including the Indigenous peoples who once served as guardians of these lands. Conservation groups, tribes, federal officials and state leaders have teamed up to acquire 54,000 acres near Laguna and west of Albuquerque. A portion of this land has already […]]]>

Sacred lands that have been cut off will once again be accessible to the public, including the Indigenous peoples who once served as guardians of these lands.

Conservation groups, tribes, federal officials and state leaders have teamed up to acquire 54,000 acres near Laguna and west of Albuquerque.

A portion of this land has already been transferred to the New Mexico Department of Fish and Game for management, while the remainder will be transferred over the next five years.

This purchase includes two adjoining properties and has been named L Bar Ranch. It will, in future, be combined with the adjacent Marquez Wildlife Management Area.

In addition to increasing access to recreation, the acquisition will protect habitat and archaeological sites near Mount Taylor, a composite volcano sacred to several Native American groups.

The property includes sites sacred to several tribes and Pueblos of New Mexico, including the Navajo Nation and the Pueblos of Laguna, Acoma and Zuni, including approximately 1,000 archaeological sites. Approximately half of the property is within Mount Taylor Traditional Cultural Property. Mount Taylor’s traditional cultural ownership includes federal, tribal, state, private, and land-grant properties and encompasses more than 442,000 acres.

In a press release announcing the acquisition, Theresa Pasqual, program director for the Pueblo of Acoma, spoke of her people’s connection to Mount Taylor.

“It’s important to Acoma in terms of how we orient ourselves to the landscape,” she said. “This particular mountain is associated with the cardinal direction of north, and religious and cultural significance is associated with it.”

She said the Acoma people would have traditionally used the land in what is now L Bar Ranch to collect wood and plants as well as for their wildlife resources.

“The purchase and protection of the L Bar property represents the potential for younger generations of Acoma children who have never seen these lands to now have a chance to rediscover them,” Pasqual said.

Pueblo d’Acoma Governor Randall Vicente also spoke about the historic connection to L Bar Ranch in the press release.

“Before becoming private property, the area in and around the L Bar Ranch was used by the Pueblo for traditional cultural and ceremonial purposes,” he said. “The pilgrimage trails are always evident, as well as the geographical sight connections to the Sandia and Manzano mountains. The Pueblo hopes that once the purchase is complete, an ethnographic study can be conducted to identify areas, places and sites of cultural significance.

The organization Trust for Public Land led the effort to acquire the land. He has been in New Mexico for approximately 40 years and focuses on acquiring land based on community priorities to increase access to nature. In the case of the L Bar Ranch property, significance to the Pueblos was a driving reason behind the acquisition.

Jim Petterson, vice president of the Mountain West region of the Trust for Public Land, said his organization heard about the L Bar Ranch about a year ago when the property came on the market. After doing some research, the Trust for Public Land began working to acquire this property. This included reaching out to state and federal officials, who helped advocate for the acquisition. State Representative Nathan Small, D-Las Cruces, worked to secure financing to help with the purchase.

“Public lands are central to New Mexicans and our way of life,” Small said in a press release. “The Marquez Wildlife Area expansion will restore access to and stewardship of sacred lands for our tribes, nations, and pueblos. All of its big game hunts will go to New Mexicans, while opening up new opportunities for recreation and conservation I am proud that our legislature has supported this effort that will benefit New Mexicans in perpetuity.

In 2011, state Senator George Muñoz, D-Gallup passed legislation requiring all big game hunting licenses for wildlife management areas to be issued to state residents. There are over 40 wildlife management areas in the state of New Mexico.

The Marquez Wildlife Management Area straddles the McKinley and Sandoval county lines and was originally purchased in 1968 to provide big game hunting opportunities.

The state provided $31 million for the purchase of the land. The total purchase price was $34.1 million.

In a press release, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham said much of that funding came from hunters and anglers. She said the acquisition will protect habitat for pronghorn, elk, cougar, deer and bear.

“As the world and New Mexico become more urban, it is essential that we conserve wild spaces. Conserving the L Bar Ranches and Marquez Wildlife Management Area is an important step in this process,” she said. “Together, they are creating more than 68,000 acres that protect migration corridors and improve wildlife conservation in New Mexico.”

Habitat management will help the animals that live on the L Bar Ranch adapt to climate change. One way to achieve this is to provide a large portion of the land without fences or barriers. The acquisition will also prevent possible future development that could destroy the habitat. The L Bar Ranch property is home to approximately 400 species of plants and animals.

According to a news release, had conservation groups and state and federal officials been unable to secure the acquisition, the land likely would have been subdivided and developed. This would have meant that sites considered sacred to several Pueblo and Navajo nations would remain in private ownership in perpetuity.

The land could also have been developed for energy extraction, including natural gas and uranium.

Petterson said a mix of public and private funds were used to acquire L Bar Ranch, including working with the New Mexico Wildlife Federation and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

US Senator Martin Heinrich, a Democrat from New Mexico, said in a press release that federal funding from the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act was used to help purchase the land. This law was passed in 1937 and reallocated the proceeds of an excise tax on firearm purchases to a grant fund for state wildlife agencies.

“The high mesas, dramatic volcanic cones and open valleys of this stunningly beautiful landscape near iconic Mount Taylor are home to cultural sites for the Pueblos of Acoma, Laguna and Zuni, and the Navajo Nation,” said he declared. “There is also abundant habitat teeming with wildlife, including large herds of elk that stretch from its northeast foothills to the Mount Taylor plateau.”

Prior to the acquisition, Petterson said it might be difficult to travel to the Marquez Wildlife Management Area due to private land. He said the acquisition will increase access to public lands.

He said access to nature is extremely important for mental and physical health.

He said L Bar Ranch features “very dramatic volcanic cones rising from the valley floor.” It also has mesa and ponderosa pine forests as well as grasslands.

The high-altitude property ranges from 6,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level.

Peterson said the Trust for Public Land has said the Department of Game and Fish must now develop a management plan for the land and he anticipates his organization will be involved in this process as a stakeholder similar to other groups and individuals.

Once the transfer of ownership is fully completed, which is being done in stages, and the management plan is in place, Petterson said members of the Trust for Public Land will enjoy visiting the area like other residents of New -Mexico.

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Research on sustainable resource management at the center of a new open access journal https://nflandtrust.org/research-on-sustainable-resource-management-at-the-center-of-a-new-open-access-journal/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 23:23:32 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/research-on-sustainable-resource-management-at-the-center-of-a-new-open-access-journal/ Ehsan Vahidi, John N. Butler Endowed Professor of Extractive Metallurgy, has been named associate editor of the open-access journal, Frontiers of sustainable resource management. Vahidi’s research crosses traditional boundaries between metallurgical engineering and sustainability science. He has published impactful research on greenhouse gas mitigation strategies in the U.S. building industry, the role of building materials […]]]>

Ehsan Vahidi, John N. Butler Endowed Professor of Extractive Metallurgy, has been named associate editor of the open-access journal, Frontiers of sustainable resource management. Vahidi’s research crosses traditional boundaries between metallurgical engineering and sustainability science. He has published impactful research on greenhouse gas mitigation strategies in the U.S. building industry, the role of building materials in greenhouse gas emissions, and net zero opportunities in mining and recycling of critical minerals.

Frontiers is an open access publisher of peer-reviewed journals in over 900 academic disciplines. Frontiers in Sustainable Resource Management focuses on human use of natural resources and publications cover topics related to natural resources, sustainable land use, sustainable materials, smart technologies, sustainable policies and land management. waste. The journal integrates earth and natural sciences with engineering, technology, and social and corporate responsibility. As Associate Editor, Vahidi is instrumental in launching the new journal.

“With an incredible editorial team, this new open access journal will help shape the future of sustainable materials and minerals,” said Vahidi.

In 2022, the multinational accounting and auditing firm KPMG has named environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues as the biggest risk for companies in the Global Mining Outlook report, outperforming the price of the products they sell and access to talent, for the first time in 12 years of risk and opportunity research history. Vahidi’s appointment and the publication of the new journal come at a critical time.

“The publication of this journal is a great opportunity to grow our sustainable economy,” said Executive Vice President and Provost Jeffrey Thompson. “Vahidi’s appointment is recognition of his impactful research in the area of ​​sustainable resource management, and I look forward to reviewing his contributions as Associate Editor.”

Vahidi was recruited to the Mackay School of Earth Sciences and Engineering in 2020 with the offer of his appointed position, the John N. Butler Endowed Professorship in Extractive Metallurgy. The named chair was established in 1986 through a gift from the estate of metallurgy professor John Butler, who served as chair of the departments of chemical and metallurgical engineering and mining engineering.


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Mississippi River Brainerd Watershed to Adopt One Watershed, One Plan – Pine and Lakes Echo Journal https://nflandtrust.org/mississippi-river-brainerd-watershed-to-adopt-one-watershed-one-plan-pine-and-lakes-echo-journal/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 19:05:28 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/mississippi-river-brainerd-watershed-to-adopt-one-watershed-one-plan-pine-and-lakes-echo-journal/ BRAINERD – The Mississippi River Brainerd has been selected by the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources for the One Watershed, One Plan program. Local professionals are seeking public input on the program’s implementation through a launch event on Monday, June 6 at Camp Ripley. The program allows counties to move from county-based water […]]]>

BRAINERD – The Mississippi River Brainerd has been selected by the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources for the One Watershed, One Plan program. Local professionals are seeking public input on the program’s implementation through a launch event on Monday, June 6 at Camp Ripley.

The program allows counties to move from county-based water management planning to watershed-based planning.

The Mississippi Brainerd River watershed begins in Aitkin County and continues where the river passes through the towns of Aitkin, Brainerd, Baxter, and Little Falls. The watershed encompasses all or parts of Aitkin, Cass, Crow Wing, Morrison, and Todd counties.

The local professionals developing the plan have scheduled a public kickoff to get feedback on long-range planning. The event will take place from 4:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Environmental Classroom, Building 11-1 (TACC). The initial planning meeting will inform the public about the planning process and gather information and feedback from citizens and watershed stakeholders on natural resource priorities.

“Because you live in the area and use the resources of the land, local citizens are essential to the contributing process,” Shannon Wettsein, Morrison Soil and Water Conservation District Manager, said in a statement. Press. “With a resident knowledge base, we will be able to better develop a reasonable long-term plan that reflects the needs and concerns of our citizens. Public input matters.

Attendees will be able to visit and enjoy Camp Ripley’s environmental classroom with hundreds of wildlife species on display, learn about the One Watershed, One Plan process, take a virtual tour of the watershed, learn about the current state of the watershed and provide comments. that will help in the planning process and help with prioritization and targeting. A complimentary light meal will be available.

Registration is mandatory. To register, contact Lance Chisholm at 320-631-3556 or lance.chisholm@morrisonswcd.org. Include your name and the number of other guests who will be attending the event. Bring a government-issued ID or driver’s license to access Camp Ripley.

For those unable to attend the event, a short survey is available to gather concerns, opinions and ideas to

https://arcg.is/0HW4zv

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30% of New York would be kept under invoice on Hochul’s desk https://nflandtrust.org/30-of-new-york-would-be-kept-under-invoice-on-hochuls-desk/ Thu, 26 May 2022 21:55:56 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/30-of-new-york-would-be-kept-under-invoice-on-hochuls-desk/ ALBANY — Thirty percent of all land in New York could be kept under a bill passed by the state Senate overwhelmingly earlier this week. If signed by Governor Kathy Hochul, the state would have until 2030 to conserve 11% more of its lands and waters — 19% are already protected — in a plan […]]]>

ALBANY — Thirty percent of all land in New York could be kept under a bill passed by the state Senate overwhelmingly earlier this week.

If signed by Governor Kathy Hochul, the state would have until 2030 to conserve 11% more of its lands and waters — 19% are already protected — in a plan to fight climate change, to expand the state’s biodiversity and preserve farmland.

Rep. Pat Fahy, D-Albany, one of the architects of the bill, said nothing would require property owners in New York to surrender their property.

“There is no eminent domain,” she said.

Instead, land will be conserved through conversation easements — paid agreements with landowners that their land will remain undeveloped — and voluntary land acquisitions, according to Fahy. The state will also have partners in non-governmental conservation groups, whose easements and purchases will count toward the 30% goal, as will conservation easements on farms.

Easements on farms, agreements with farmers not to develop their fields, are “certainly seen as a significant part of the bill,” Fahy said.

These easements “are essential for smart growth efforts and for preserving the land instead of it turning into the sort of runaway sprawl that has been a problem for decades,” she said.


The legislation also talks about how land conservation can build resilience to natural disasters, which are on the rise due to global warming, but the main purpose of the bill is to combat climate change and its effects.

The genesis of the bill lies with the United Nations, which is in the process of finalizing the “Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework“, which recommends the goal of conserving 30% of the planet’s land and oceans.

The legislation would tie into the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act of 2019 (CLCPA), which requires the state to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. The CLCPA actually sets the goal of reduce emissions by 85%; New York will need to remove carbon from the atmosphere to achieve net zero emissions.

According to Jessica Ottney Mahar, director of New York City policy and strategy for The Nature Conservancy, one way to do this is to “sequester” carbon in plant life in natural lands, though she has added that carbon storage technology should be developed. to achieve the net zero goal.

An “exciting” aspect of the bill, Mahar said, was the potential to preserve underrepresented habitats. Catskill Park and Adirondack Park, the state’s largest conservation areas, are both forests, and the bill could prompt the state to look at the science of the kind of ecosystems it protects .

The bill would require that a variety of habitats be conserved and that conservation be split between rural, suburban and urban settings.

Urban forests are important in the face of climate change because they cool cities during heat waves, and it is important for the state to distribute investments in different neighborhoods, because urban open spaces are traditionally located near richer areas, Mahar said.

The bill’s passage through the Senate and State Assembly has been applauded by The Nature Conservancy and other conservation groups.

This included the Scenic Hudson Group, whose director of government relations and public policy, Andy Bicking, said the group and its partners in the Hudson Valley “have worked together to continuously protect the lands and natural resources of our region, and we are ready and ready to partner with the State to carry out [proposed] Politics.”

Conserving New York’s land would also help plant and animal species that have been impacted by climate change and other anthropogenic pressures.

The impacts were severe. In 2019, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology published a study that found there were 2.9 billion fewer birds in North America than there were in 1970, a 29% drop. .

Erin McGrath, senior policy officer for the New York Audubon Society, said the new bill could help mitigate that loss.

“One of the main drivers of these population declines is habitat loss, which means we need to prioritize the rest of the bird habitat we have in order to see populations rebound,” he said. she declared.

Eleven percent of New York is a big chunk of land — about 6,000 square miles — but the bill doesn’t include a tax claim.

Fahy said the state’s $300 million Environmental Protection Fund could help, as could the $4 billion Environmental Bond Act, which is expected to be passed by New Yorkers in the election. of November.

The bill passed the Senate 58 to 3, with overwhelming bipartisan support.

Sen. Mike Martucci (R-Catskills), one of the bill’s co-sponsors, said in a statement that he supports the legislation because he believes in “preserving our agricultural production and heritage.” , protecting open space and defending against overdevelopment in order to maintain and improve the quality of life here in the Hudson Valley and Catskills and throughout New York City.”

“Being good stewards of our environment shouldn’t be a partisan issue, and I’ve worked hard to get realistic goals and practical policies like this no matter who else joins me,” according to Martucci. .

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