Land Conversion – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:08:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nflandtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-138x136.png Land Conversion – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ 32 32 Stoke-on-Trent City Council planning applications week ending Sunday 22 May https://nflandtrust.org/stoke-on-trent-city-council-planning-applications-week-ending-sunday-22-may/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:08:24 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/stoke-on-trent-city-council-planning-applications-week-ending-sunday-22-may/ The list below, taken from the Stoke-on-Trent City Council website on Monday May 23, contains planning applications which became valid the previous week in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. Extension of existing motorcycle training centre, Bryans Road Safety Centre, Stanley Matthews Way, Trentham, Stoke-on-Trent Two Storey Side Extension, 6 Cheltenham Grove, Birches Head, Stoke-on-Trent Single storey front, side […]]]>

The list below, taken from the Stoke-on-Trent City Council website on Monday May 23, contains planning applications which became valid the previous week in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire.

  • Extension of existing motorcycle training centre, Bryans Road Safety Centre, Stanley Matthews Way, Trentham, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Two Storey Side Extension, 6 Cheltenham Grove, Birches Head, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Single storey front, side and rear extension, dormer extension and alterations, 53 The Wood, Meir, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Two storey side extension, 2 St Peters Walk, Cobridge, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Erection of a detached dwelling, Taj House, 165 Star And Garter Road, Lightwood, Stoke-on-Trent
  • One new externally lit wall display panel, two replacement externally lit wall display panels, one replacement internally lit freestanding poster display, one new freestanding cart information panel unlit, a new unlit double sided parking sign, refurbishment of an existing externally lit double sided pylon sign and a new large freestanding externally lit billboard, Lidl, High Street, Tunstall , Stoke-on-Trent
  • Single storey rear/side extension, 2 Waterlily Close, Etruria, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Installation of two new windows in the side elevation, 74 Etruria Vale Road, Etruria, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Three fascia illuminated signs, Stairbox, St Mowden Park Stoke South, Dennis Viollet Avenue, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Loft conversion to contain forward and rear facing dormer windows, 5 Baddeley Green Lane, Baddeley Green, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Replacement of outdoor dining area, associated external alterations and erection of storage shed in service yard (Listed Building Consent), The Orange Tree, 371 Newcastle Road, Trent Vale, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Replacement external dining room, associated external alterations and erection of a storage shed in the service yard, The Orange Tree, 371 Newcastle Road, Trent Vale, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Single Storey Side and Rear Extension, 20 Woodland Avenue, Norton Green, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Construction of two dwellings with associated parking, land at Greenway Place, Abbey Hulton, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Erection of a two-storey portable classroom building for a period of two years, Ormiston Meridian Academy, Sandon Road, Meir, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Internal signage installation (Consent to Listed Buildings), Stoke-on-Trent Railway Station, Station Road, Stoke, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Modification of state 1 (temporary building) of authorization ref. 61105/FUL, Van National, George Eastham Avenue, Stoke, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Three illuminated fascia signs, individual lettering on building elevations and two illuminated freestanding totem signs, The Royal Doulton Outlet Superstore, Forge Lane, Etruria, Stoke-on-Trent
  • Proposed car park with reconfiguration of existing car park, ISS Technical Services, Forge Lane, Etruria, Stoke-on-Trent


Dplanning applications decided for the same period

  • Single storey rear extension (prior approval), 17 Granville Avenue, Sneyd Green, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Demolition of existing conservatory and construction of rear single storey extension, 3 Torridon Close, Trentham, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Construction of a 2.5 storey apartment block with 8 self-contained studio apartments with associated exterior landscaping, bin and cycle store, land adjacent to 36 St John Street, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Single Storey Side Extension, 45 The Lea, Trentham, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Removal of Pine Tree (TPO No 4), Land Opposite, 15 Boscombe Grove, Trentham, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • First floor side extension and garage conversion, 33 Light Oaks Avenue, Milton, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Change of use from student accommodation to mixed use comprising student accommodation (4 units) and large multi-occupancy house (Sui Generis), associated elevation changes, formation of amenity space at the rear and moving bin store, London House, London Road, Stoke, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Construction of a commercial unit and 1 bedroom apartment on the ground floor and two duplex apartments on the upper floors, land adjacent to 17-19 Hulton Street, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Block erection of 4 no. apartments and associated exterior works, land adjacent to 70 St John Street, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Change of use to an open storage facility (use class B8) and associated erection of 2 concrete bays, laying of a hard floor and erection of a boundary fence (partly retrospective), D Price and Sons, Sutherland Road, Longton, Stoke-on-Trento – Status: Decided
  • Change of use of first, second and third floors to 12 self-contained residential apartments, 32-38, Piccadilly, Hanley, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Decided
  • Amendment to Conditions 2 (Approved Plans and Documents) and 24 (Sound Attenuation) of Permit 63096/FUL, Former Fenton Local Center and Car Park, 5 Baker Street, Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent – Status: Withdrawn

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Government to wink at Min to convert plots larger than 1,000 m² | Goa News https://nflandtrust.org/government-to-wink-at-min-to-convert-plots-larger-than-1000-m%c2%b2-goa-news/ Fri, 13 May 2022 19:38:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/government-to-wink-at-min-to-convert-plots-larger-than-1000-m%c2%b2-goa-news/ Panaji: In what is seen as a contradiction to reforms initiated by Chief Minister Pramod Sawant, the Revenue Department has proposed a memo that would require ministerial approval before issuing sanads for properties measuring over 1,000 m². Earlier this week, the revenue department ordered the two district collectors to suspend all sanad approvals for plots […]]]>
Panaji: In what is seen as a contradiction to reforms initiated by Chief Minister Pramod Sawant, the Revenue Department has proposed a memo that would require ministerial approval before issuing sanads for properties measuring over 1,000 m².
Earlier this week, the revenue department ordered the two district collectors to suspend all sanad approvals for plots over 1,000 sq m.
“The undersigned hereby directs you that all files relating to the sanad for land to be converted over 1,000 m² be submitted to the government for approval,” reads the note released by the office of the Minister of Revenue Atanasio Monserrate. The decision has created apprehensions within the real estate industry as the move will delay approvals for real estate and commercial projects.
“We are being made to understand that a note is being moved to return sanad conversion files for areas over 1000m² to the government for approval. stakeholders,” said CREDAI – Goa Chairman, Nilesh Salkar.
Prior to portfolio allocation, Sawant ended the need for ministerial approval for real estate projects and delegated authority to taluka and district level officers.
Sawant had also said that the government also intends to embark on the online issuance of zoning and CNO certificates under section 49(6) of the TCP Act for the registration of parcel documents.
Town and Country Planning Minister Vishwajit Rane had announced a series of reforms including an online case tracking system from May 1, deemed approvals for commercial and residential projects after 21 45 days and the approval of construction plans by approved architects for constructions with buildings up to 500 m².
Monserrate’s decision appears to negate actions taken by his cabinet colleagues.
“The tax authorities can give the necessary instructions to the collectors concerned in the North and the South, in this regard, as a priority. In the meantime, the files concerning the conversions of land of more than 1,000 m² will be suspended until they have been approved by the government”, indicates the note moved by the tax authorities.
CREDAI requested the intervention of the Chief Minister. “We urge the Chief Minister to look into this matter and make a pragmatic decision that will keep industry confidence high,” Salkar said.
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District of Gedling: Planning applications submitted near you https://nflandtrust.org/district-of-gedling-planning-applications-submitted-near-you/ Wed, 11 May 2022 12:11:40 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/district-of-gedling-planning-applications-submitted-near-you/ An HMO in Netherfield and plans to convert a church into flats are among many applications submitted to Gedling Borough Council last week. Here’s a roundup of the latest plans that council planning officers will now vote on. Arnold – Advertisement – Two-storey side extension to an existing dwelling56 Langley Avenue Arnold Nottinghamshire NG5 6NNRef. […]]]>

An HMO in Netherfield and plans to convert a church into flats are among many applications submitted to Gedling Borough Council last week.

Here’s a roundup of the latest plans that council planning officers will now vote on.

Arnold

– Advertisement –

Two-storey side extension to an existing dwelling
56 Langley Avenue Arnold Nottinghamshire NG5 6NN
Ref. No: 2022/0463

Single storey rear extension
24 Arnot Hill Road Arnold Nottingham Nottinghamshire NG5 6LL
Ref. No: 2022/0416PN

Two-story side extension.
109 Ravenswood Road Arnold Nottinghamshire NG5 7FY
Ref. No: 2022/0343

– Advertisement –

Single storey side/rear extension
43 Castleton Avenue Arnold Nottingham Nottinghamshire NG5 6NH
Ref. No: 2021/1295

Bestwood

No planning request this week

Burton Joyce

No planning request this week

Calverton

carlton

– Advertisement –

Two-stage side extension
4 Belper Avenue Carlton Nottinghamshire NG4 3SD
Ref. No: 2022/0324

Removal of the existing veranda; two-stage and single side extension rear floor extension
9 Egling Croft Colwick Nottinghamshire NG4 2DB
Ref. No: 2022/0322

One-storey rear extension to replace existing veranda
5 Acacia Crescent Carlton Nottinghamshire NG4 3JH
Ref. No: 2022/0297

lowered border
113 Burton Road Carlton Nottingham Nottinghamshire NG4 3GN
Ref. No: 2022/0042

Colwick

Construction of an industrial building annexed to the existing manufacturing operations.
Luxfer Gas Cylinders Ltd Road No 2 Colwick Nottinghamshire NG4 2BH
Ref. No: 2022/0298

Proposed concrete mixing station
Chris Allsop Recycling LEEC Development Site Road No 2 Colwick Nottinghamshire NG4 2JR
Ref. No: 2021/0163

Gedling

Single-stage and two-stage front extensions; flat-roofed front dormer and roof modifications, one-storey rear addition, construction of a two-storey connected triple garage and plaster dwelling.
87 Main Road Gedling Nottinghamshire NG4 3HD
Ref. No: 2022/0270

Lambley

No planning request this week

linby

Full planning permission for 135 units with access from Delia Avenue and Dorothy Avenue
Land off Hayden Lane Linby Nottinghamshire
Ref. No: 2022/0501

Double garage and side extension on one level.
14 Fountayne Close Linby NG15 8JQ
Ref. No: 2021/1435

Mapperley

Single storey rear extension
35 Bradstone Drive Mapperley Nottinghamshire NG3 5SY
Ref. No: 2022/0529

Install the extractor/duct on the side elevation of the building
914 Woodborough Road Mapperley Nottinghamshire NG3 5QRR ref. No: 2022/0300

Front porch, two-story side extension, single and two-story rear extensions
17 Robinson Road Mapperley Nottinghamshire NG3 6BA
Ref. No: 2022/0195

Single storey rear and side extension, raised deck and porch erection
70A Whittingham Road Mapperley Nottingham Nottinghamshire NG3 6BH
Ref. No: 2022/0089

Netherfield

Exterior wall insulation
15 Garnet Street Netherfield Nottinghamshire NG4 2FB
Ref. No: 2022/0254

Exterior wall insulation
54 Carnarvon Street Netherfield Nottinghamshire NG4 2FP
Ref. No: 2022/0257

Conversion of existing church property, with subsequent change of use, from community center (class F2 – former class D2) to 13 one-bed residential accommodation (class C3) with internal and external common areas, storage room, Secure bins, bike storage and parking provisions.
Netherfield Victoria Road Methodist Church Netherfield Nottinghamshire NG4 2HU
Ref. No: 2022/0240

Exterior wall insulation
31 Carnarvon Street Netherfield Nottinghamshire NG4 2FL
Ref. No: 2022/0238

Exterior wall insulation
38 Godfrey Street Netherfield Nottinghamshire NG4 2JG
Ref. No: 2022/0213

Proposed change of use from housing (C3) to 7 bedroom HMO including conversion of rear dormer
49 Chandos Street Netherfield Nottinghamshire NG4 2LP
Ref. No: 2022/0153

Newstead

No planning request this week

Ravenshead

Demolition of proposed existing dwelling Detached 4 bedroom house, detached annex and detached triple garage
54 Longdale Lane Ravenshead Nottinghamshire NG15 9AD
Ref. No: 2022/0540

Proposed one-storey rear extensions and modifications to the existing roof. Carport proposed at the front.
30 Rowan Avenue Ravenshead Nottingham Nottinghamshire NG15 9GA
Ref. No: 2022/0510

Project to extend the rear projection of the existing Farmshop (after the removal of the existing rear timber storage shed); and authorization is also sought for the extension of the perimeter of the northwest boundary (retrospective) and the maintenance of 3 no. cold rooms (retrospective)
Ravenshead Farm Shop at 131 Main Road Ravenshead Nottinghamshire NG15 9GS
Ref. No: 2022/0181

One-story side extension
36 Linwood Ravenshead Crescent NG15 9FZ
Ref. No: 2022/0038

Fallen T13. Raise the crown and prune T3, T5, T8 and T9
The Hollies Ravenshead Nottinghamshire
Ref. No.: 2021/1122TPO

red hill

Two-stage front and side extension and single-stage rear extension
18 Redhill Lodge Drive Redhill Nottinghamshire NG5 8JH
Ref. No: 2022/0258

Woodborough

Offered 2 detached 4 bedroom units on two floors with garages to the front.
Land on East Side Roe Hill Woodborough Nottinghamshire
Ref. No: 2022/0441

Certificate of legal development to regularize the use of the land as garden land / residential land
Ashvale Bank Hill Woodborough Nottinghamshire NG14 6EF
Ref. No: 2022/0331

Woodthorpe

Hill Bros premises which include a single storey workshop on the right side and a two storey office and reception unit on the left. Also included small rear units.
34 Marlborough Road Woodthorpe Nottinghamshire NG5 4GB
Ref. No: 2022/0527

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Our Jellyfish range is perfect for switching from HPS lamps to LED lamps https://nflandtrust.org/our-jellyfish-range-is-perfect-for-switching-from-hps-lamps-to-led-lamps/ Mon, 09 May 2022 12:20:10 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/our-jellyfish-range-is-perfect-for-switching-from-hps-lamps-to-led-lamps/ We have rich experience in the lighting industry. Since our establishment in 2002, we have nearly 20 years of experience. Mr. Wang, Director of Hortibest, said, “We have been focusing on the research and development of artificial lights for plants since 2017, and established our own brand Hortibest to provide a series of plant lighting […]]]>

We have rich experience in the lighting industry. Since our establishment in 2002, we have nearly 20 years of experience. Mr. Wang, Director of Hortibest, said, “We have been focusing on the research and development of artificial lights for plants since 2017, and established our own brand Hortibest to provide a series of plant lighting equipment for greenhouses and other indoor crops. We currently have our own teams in North America and Europe, and the scale of our business continues to expand.

Plant lighting has become a hot topic in recent years. With the scarcity of land resources and the growth of the urban population, ensuring a safe and efficient food supply has become a major challenge, and indoor agriculture is emerging as one of the solutions, which has led to the development of lighting vegetal. industry. In addition, we have noticed that the demand for industrial hemp has also increased in recent years. Growing cannabis requires very strong light, and plant lighting shows great promise in this area. However, there is an oversupply in the US industrial hemp market, resulting in a price phenomenon, which will certainly affect the demand for LED lamps. The market is constantly changing dynamically, and we have to constantly adjust our strategy according to market changes, Wang explained.

Jellyfish series – perfect replacement of HPS to LED

Our Jellyfish product line is a great solution for growers looking to upgrade from HPS to more energy efficient LED lights, allowing for 1:1 replacement. Growers do not need to update their existing circuit and lighting diagrams, which can be done in minutes. At the same time, the fanless design solves the problem of fan noise, achieves efficient heat dissipation and prolongs the service life of the lamps. When the intensity of natural light is not sufficient, producers will use artificial lighting, which will increase energy costs. Our Jellyfish products can achieve 45% energy savings.

Looking for talent

Foreign producers are looking for products that can really help them. They will focus more on the product itself rather than the price. Product quality and service are most critical. To this end, we have strengthened our services and built up a good reputation. We also have our own team in Europe. Mr. Wang said that in order to further support our business in Europe, we are looking for more professionals to join us to better serve our customers and do a good supporting job. We are currently looking for a seller who speaks Dutch. Hortibest is a friendly team and we want our employees to find their own value in the company and do what they love to do. We are willing to teach all knowledge to our employees and grow together.

More information

hortibest

Simon Wang

info@hortibest.com

https://www.hortibest.com/

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Champion of women’s right to manage land and forests wins top environmental award https://nflandtrust.org/champion-of-womens-right-to-manage-land-and-forests-wins-top-environmental-award/ Sat, 07 May 2022 02:00:38 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/champion-of-womens-right-to-manage-land-and-forests-wins-top-environmental-award/ Between 2010 and 2018, the rate of deforestation worldwide slowed by almost 30% compared to the previous ten years, according to a key report launched on Tuesday by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). . The Global Forest Resources Assessment remote sensing survey, however, warned that, from cattle grazing in South […]]]>

Between 2010 and 2018, the rate of deforestation worldwide slowed by almost 30% compared to the previous ten years, according to a key report launched on Tuesday by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). .

The Global Forest Resources Assessment remote sensing survey, however, warned that, from cattle grazing in South America to cropland expansion in Asia, the planet’s tropical rainforests still face a huge threat.

“This survey is important, not only for the new numbers it gives us, but also for what it tells us about trends in forest area and the causes of deforestation, as well as for the crucial ability that it allows us to follow the evolution of things”, declared the assistant director of the FAO. General, Maria Helena Semedo.

Losses cut in half

Annual deforestation decreased by about 29 percent, from 11 million hectares per year between 2000 and 2010 to 7.8 million hectares between 2010 and 2018, the survey found.

Besides, net forest area losses more than halved during the investigation period – from 6.8 million hectares per year between 2000 and 2010 to 3.1 million hectares per year from 2010 to 2018.

By region, the highest level of deforestation between 2000 and 2018 occurred in South America (68 million hectares deforested), followed by Africa (49 million hectares).

This despite a slower rate of deforestation in South America and South and Southeast Asia between 2000 and 2018.

“Unsustainable agricultural development and other land uses continue to put intense pressure on our forests, especially in many of the poorest countries“said Ms. Semedo.

Unsustainable development

Between 2000 and 2018, tropical forest losses accounted for more than 90% of global deforestation.

And although that equates to 157 million hectares – roughly the size of Western Europe – annual deforestation in the tropics has slowed dramatically, from 10.1 million hectares per year between 2000 and 2010 to seven million hectares per year between 2010 and 2018.

“There are win-win solutions that we can and must scale up to feed the world without destroying our forests,” the FAO official said.

Drive deforestation

The expansion of cropland is the main driver of deforestationresponsible for nearly half of global deforestation, followed by livestock grazing, accounting for 38.5%.

From 2000 to 2018, palm oil plantations alone accounted for 7% of global deforestation.

While the survey suggests that the Central American tropics are most at risk from land use conversion, similar phenomena have been detected in the tropical dry forest and shrublands of the region.

However, the small number of samples in these ecoregions means that further research is needed to confirm these results.

Tap the solutions in nature

The XV World Forestry Congress (WFC) opened Monday in Seoul, Korea, as well as online.

Launching the event, Ms Semedo said that “whatever crises we face – a pandemic, conflicts, climate change – and [their] the resulting economic recession and food insecurity, we need to see our forests and natural resources as part of the solution and integrate them into recovery plans and strategies.

The Collaborative Partnership on Forests (CPF) states that protecting forests helps fight climate change, enhance food security, conserve biodiversity and spur efforts to create a world without poverty.

State of the forests

Under the main theme Building a green, healthy and resilient future with forestsleaders from the FAO, the World Bank and youth and indigenous representatives participated in the discussions

Along with the launch of the survey, as part of the 2020 Forest Resources Assessment, FAO on Monday launched its flagship State of the World’s Forests 2022 report.

The report highlighted the three mutually reinforcing paths to stopping deforestation and sustaining forests; restore degraded lands and expand reforestation; and ensure sustainable value chains.

Other key findings include the need to enshrine land rights; provide incentives and remove barriers to forest conservation; and the urgency of addressing the conflict between forest conservation and other development needs.

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Small district wins big victory over ‘negative impacts’ of logging industry https://nflandtrust.org/small-district-wins-big-victory-over-negative-impacts-of-logging-industry/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:21:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/small-district-wins-big-victory-over-negative-impacts-of-logging-industry/ Dominico Zapata / Stuff Wairoa District Council has won a major legal battle against the forestry sector. (File photo) A small district in a badly deprived area has won a major victory over the forestry sector as a judge agreed that a council had the right to raise tariffs on forest land due to ‘negative […]]]>
Wairoa District Council has won a major legal battle against the forestry sector.  (File photo)

Dominico Zapata / Stuff

Wairoa District Council has won a major legal battle against the forestry sector. (File photo)

A small district in a badly deprived area has won a major victory over the forestry sector as a judge agreed that a council had the right to raise tariffs on forest land due to ‘negative community welfare’ “.

The NZ Forest Owners Association Inc. has failed in its application for judicial review by the High Court of Wairoa District Council’s decision to raise rates on forest land.

Members of the association own approximately 52,000 hectares in the district.

The council, which has a small rating base of around 8300, has overhauled its system to make rates more affordable for residents and smaller commercial properties.

READ MORE:
* Southland District Council is considering a rate increase of 9.22pc
* Residential property values ​​in the Southland district have risen 46% in three years, valuations reveal
* Explanation: How are rates calculated and why have yours increased?

Wairoa Mayor Craig Little said community well-being and affordability of fares

Tom Kitchin/RNZ

Wairoa Mayor Craig Little said community well-being and fare affordability “were at the forefront of our decision-making.” (File photo)

The changes increased rates for high-value properties, although this did not allow the council to collect more rates.

Forestry was the hardest hit, with 115 forest sector taxpayers paying an additional $334,000. The increase is due to additional costs for road maintenance and an “increase to reflect the negative community welfare impacts of industry on the district”.

The review was heard by Judge Christine Grice at Gisborne High Court in February.

The association argued that the rating decision was “unfair and unreasonable and in particular wrongly targeted forestry because it was wealthy”.

He said the council failed to consider environmental wellbeing and climate change and incorrectly assumed that forestry was the cause of the negative wellbeing.

Wairoa, in northern Hawke's Bay, has a population of approximately 8,300.  The median individual income was just $22,600.  (File photo)

Wairoa District Council / Supplied

Wairoa, in northern Hawke’s Bay, has a population of approximately 8,300. The median individual income was just $22,600. (File photo)

He also said the council used the Classification Act as a means of discouraging the conversion of productive land to forestry “because it had no power to regulate against the conversion of agricultural land to forestry”.

Wairoa Mayor Craig Little told the court that community well-being and affordability of rates “are at the forefront of our decision-making” and that he recognizes that forestry is an important industry, but that its benefits were widely appreciated outside Wairoa.

The court heard the district’s median individual income was just $22,600, employment levels had fallen and the unemployment rate had risen to 7.2% in 2018.

Forest plantations in the district had increased significantly during this period.

THING

As forestry investors grab land for carbon farming, farmers feel anxious and inaudible.

In a ruling issued last week, Judge Grice dismissed all of the association’s claims.

She said a council was “obligated to act in accordance with principles, including the promotion of the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of its community”, and had the right to make any rate adjustment that ‘He did.

She said that the council was entitled to take into account that forest land yielded more than other land, and that it was entitled to conclude that forestry had a negative impact on the well-being of the community.

She also noted that forestry lacked the constraints faced by others “due to incentives such as the Billion Tree Fund and grants such as carbon credit grants”, and that the council was entitled to take them into account, whether the forest owners claim the subsidy or not.

The application was dismissed on all grounds.

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Protein alternatives support net zero, land stewardship and sustainability https://nflandtrust.org/protein-alternatives-support-net-zero-land-stewardship-and-sustainability/ Tue, 03 May 2022 00:01:31 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/protein-alternatives-support-net-zero-land-stewardship-and-sustainability/ Will Bisset, Entocycle’s business development director, said the company is currently building a factory in Scotland, where 1.7 million tonnes of food are wasted each year. Speaking at the NFU’s annual poultry research seminar, Bisset said the company would use black soldier flies, which can convert food waste into protein in just 12 days. “Black […]]]>

Will Bisset, Entocycle’s business development director, said the company is currently building a factory in Scotland, where 1.7 million tonnes of food are wasted each year.

Speaking at the NFU’s annual poultry research seminar, Bisset said the company would use black soldier flies, which can convert food waste into protein in just 12 days. “Black soldier flies are amazing bio-converters that take just about any organic waste and convert it into real, high-quality protein.”

A safe alternative form of protein

Black soldier fly eggs receive the waste from food producers, brewers and distillers and within 2 weeks the larvae consume the waste, grow into adults from which the company extracts co-products, such as protein , lipids and fertilizers for use in pet food. and potential use in the aquaculture and animal feed sectors as a safe alternative form of protein.

At one of its farms, Entocycle expects to produce 2,200 tons of grubs and 2,200 tons of dung (a potential soil amendment given current fertilizer prices) per year.

100% organic and regional food for monogastrics in Europe

Dr Lindsay Whistance, The Organic Research Centre, sustainable feed and planting design for organic poultry ranges, spoke about the pan-European OK-Net EcoFeed project, which aimed to work towards 100% organic and regional feed for monogastrics in Europe.

One of the conclusions regarding the feeding of poultry and pigs with 100% organic and locally produced feed, specific proteins and amino acids, was that it is a challenge, but that approaches potential could solve the problems. Whistance said the possibilities for combinations of foods grown in the region and fed to low-yielding breeds through different strategies were many. A total of 18 trials in 8 European countries have been set up, lasting 3 years and shared on the platform.

Feed nettles to laying hens

Among the trials discussed by Whistance was a German initiative that planned to use nettles for laying hens in 2 feeding trials. Dried nettles were used in proportions of 10% (trial 1) and 5% (trial 2) in the respective farm rations, replacing 5% of the existing protein source. In trial 1, the ground grass was further reduced by 5%. Fodder was prepared on farms equipped with mobile grinding and mixing equipment and feed was distributed ad libitum to nearly 300 laying hens through automatic feeders. The bird genetic users were Sandy (trial 1) and Lohmann Brown (trial 2). The feeding duration was 10 days for trial 1 and 26 days for trial 2 with the aim of reducing the amount of protein concentrates purchased.

The results showed that the hens accepted the modified rations and that feed consumption remained stable at 120-130 g/hen/day. The faeces were solid and the spawning performance constant (80% for trial 1 and 88% for trial 2). Egg quality characteristics remained unchanged, but feed values ​​were worse than expected due to high stalk content, cost was prohibitive, and nettles are not included in the list of permitted feeds, their use increasing. large scale is therefore not currently appropriate.

Camelina in feed for laying hens

An Italian project investigated the use of Camelina in laying hen feed as an alternative protein to soybean meal, which contains interesting types and amounts of omega-3 fatty acids and tocopherols. Camelina cake, on average, is 34% protein and 10% fat with protein including 38% essential amino acids with 2.65% methionine.

Camelina can be included in the feed of laying hens up to a maximum of 10%. In the field trial, 3.5% camelina meal replaced the same amount of soybean meal and 1.5% camelina oil was also added to the feed. Subsequent trials have supported the possibility of increasing the meal percentage and, with specific varieties characterized by low anti-nutritional factors, there is potentially no need to set limits.

The trial indicated that camelina meal and oil can be fed throughout the productive life cycle of hens with no effects on laying parameters, higher omega 3 content and longer productive life. chickens and improved animal welfare.

Sprouted wheat and vetch seeds

Another trial involved sprouted wheat and vetch seeds, testing their nutritional value, including amino acid profiles. Trypsin inhibitor activity was also assessed in vetches to assess changes in anti-nutritional factors. The sprouted seeds were then fed to the layers, who preferred the vetch sprouts. There was no loss of nutritional value due to sprouting, although starch was converted to sugars in the process. Feed value begins to drop at day 5. Crude protein and amino acid profiles did not change with germination.

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Dolphins land LB Cameron Goode, who had 20.5 sacks at Cal https://nflandtrust.org/dolphins-land-lb-cameron-goode-who-had-20-5-sacks-at-cal/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:12:05 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/dolphins-land-lb-cameron-goode-who-had-20-5-sacks-at-cal/ MIAMI GARDENS — The Dolphins took their second linebacker of this draft on Saturday, selecting Cal Cameroon Goode with their first of two seventh-round picks, No. 224 overall. Goode is a 6-foot-3, 240-pound Texas native. Fourth round:Dolphins select Texas Tech wide receiver Erik Ezukanma in fourth round Draft day incident:Two injured, including one airlifted, due […]]]>
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Deforestation in Colombia | Earth.Org – Past | Present https://nflandtrust.org/deforestation-in-colombia-earth-org-past-present/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:09:47 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/deforestation-in-colombia-earth-org-past-present/ The loss of forests in Colombia is a complex story of conflict, mismanagement and illegal activity. For decades, reckless human actions have contributed to the destruction of the country’s forests, one of its most important resources. Today, cattle breeding, coca cultivation, and gold mining are big sources of income for rebel groups that have […]]]>

The loss of forests in Colombia is a complex story of conflict, mismanagement and illegal activity. For decades, reckless human actions have contributed to the destruction of the country’s forests, one of its most important resources. Today, cattle breeding, coca cultivation, and gold mining are big sources of income for rebel groups that have taken control of the country’s green spaces since the 2016 peace deal that ended decades of civil war. Although more than half of the territory is covered with trees, deforestation in Colombia makes the nation more vulnerable to climate change and contributes to the impoverishment of its population.

Deforestation in Colombia: the numbers

About 55% of Colombia is forested, covered by two main tropical forests: the Amazon and the Chocó. The former – which spans nine South American countries, although most of it lies within Brazil’s borders – is one of the most biodiverse places in the world, home to more than 3 million animals and more than 2,500 plant species. And if left standing, it can generate around $8.2 billion in annual revenue, a study found. However, mainly due to the reckless policies of Brazilian President and climate denier Jair Bolsonaro, deforestation rates in the world’s green lung have reached record highs in recent years. Although much smaller, the Chocó-Darién Rainforest has an extremely rich biodiversity and for this reason it is listed as one of the 25 global biodiversity hotspots of priority for conservation. This global ecoregion, which stretches along the Pacific coast of Colombia and north of Panama along the Caribbean coast, has suffered some of the highest levels of deforestation on record.




Between 2002 and 2020, Colombia was losing its green cover at an unprecedented rate. 1.66 million hectares of the total tree cover loss of 4.7 million hectares suffered in nearly two decades was made up of primary rainforests, the most biodiverse and carbon-rich green areas in the world. More than half of deforestation took place in Colombian Amazonwhich covers about 10% of the total territory of the country.

Figure 1: Loss of primary forest in Colombia, 2002-2020

We take a closer look at the main drivers of deforestation in Colombia and its destructive effects on the environment, the country’s biodiversity and indigenous communities.

The main drivers of deforestation in Colombia

After decades of brutal civil war, a peace accord was signed in 2016 between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Since then, deforestation has exploded. Indeed, with the approach of peace, the strict controls put in place by the FARC to protect the forests for strategic reasons were suddenly relaxed when the guerrilla group left the region, causing a scramble for resources among the farmers, miners and loggers and a 44% increase in deforestation and land grabbing. New illegal and less organized splinter groups replaced the FARC almost immediately and have since dominated parts of the rainforest. While the Colombian People’s Army used the canopy as protection against foreign attack, these new armed groups are considerably smaller and have no incentive to preserve the forests because they do not need protection.

In 2017 – the year after the peace accord was signed – the number of trees felled in Colombia accounted for 2.6% of global deforestation. In 2020, the country lost nearly 171,000 hectares of forest, an area twice the size of New York City and 8% larger than the previous year. Freed from controls and protective laws, people started cutting down trees for illegal mining, logging, cocoa farming as well as cattle ranching – Colombia’s main source of income. This activity alone contributed 1.4% of gross national product (GNP) and 21.8% of agricultural GNP in 2017.

​​Land grabbing is considered a major structural cause of deforestation in the northwest Amazon, as it encourages land use change to make room for extensive cattle ranching. Beef and veal consumption in Colombia is on the rise and is expected to reach 11.84 kg per capita by 2028. In order to satisfy the country’s insatiable demand for red meat, Colombia has significantly expanded its production in recent years. It now has more than 500,000 sites devoted to breeding as well as around 23.4 million head of cattle. Due to the lack of available space, people have started clearing land in protected areas such as Chiribiquete National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site comprising over 4 million hectares of land in the Amazon. Colombian. Here, a investigation from the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) found that illegal livestock production has tripled since 2015, with the cattle population increasing by 349% between 2016 and 2019. In four years, nearly 17,000 hectares of forest have been cleared in the forest reserve. Area surrounding the north and northeast of Chiribiquete National Park.

deforestation in colombia

Figure 2: Deforestation in the northern area of ​​Chiribiquete and La Macarena National Parks, 2016-2020

Among the main causes of deforestation in Colombia is illegal crops, which feeds international cocaine pipelines. Swathes of forest are illegally cleared each year to make way for coca plantations – which cover almost 154,000 hectares of land. This crop is notorious for its detrimental environmental impact, as the chemicals used to process the medicines – such as gasoline and sulfuric acid – are highly toxic and contribute to polluting the rivers in the area.

Another main driver is logging for timber, most of which is done illegally in protected and often remote areas where anti-deforestation laws imposed by the government in recent years are difficult to enforce. The illegal extraction, transportation and trafficking of protected timber species to flourishing international markets accounts for nearly 10% of the country’s total forest loss. Some 186 wood species found in the Colombian Amazon are sold illegally or legally, but most of the revenue comes from just nine coveted tree species.

deforestation in colombia

Figure 3: Logging in Colombia, 2021

Other lucrative activities are also often linked to deforestation. One of them is gold mining, of which Colombia is one of the world’s largest exporters. However, most gold mining in the country is illegal and strongly linked to land degradation and contamination of waterways, especially in the Chocó rainforest. Land conversion also occurs to make space for profitable extractive industries such as natural gas and oil. The latter is the main export product of the country. Despite crude oil exports down since 2014in 2020 Colombia exported nearly US$7.5 billion worth of crude oil in the United States, China, Panama, India and Saint Lucia in the eastern Caribbean Sea.

Colombia is also the fourth largest producer of Palm oil and by far the largest in the Western Hemisphere. The lucrative market has encouraged the expansion of large-scale plantations, especially in the lowland coastal forests of Chocó province. The unprecedented expansion of the palm oil supply chain exploited thousands of aboriginal people of these areas, generating protests and suffering among local communities despite government promises of post-conflict sustainable development and zero deforestation.

How is the government tackling deforestation?

Once the largest and most important carbon sinks in the world, tropical forests are being destroyed at an unsustainable rate and the countries they occupy are paying the highest price. Deforestation in Colombia harms the country’s environment, biodiversity and indigenous communities. According to a report study by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and Climate Focus. Moreover, what is considered the most biodiverse country in the world is losing many of its unique animal and plant species. Of the 3,429 known species of amphibians, birds, mammals and reptiles that live in Colombia – a fifth of which are endemic, meaning they cannot be found anywhere else in the world – more than 10% are threatened.

In 2020, President Iván Duque signed the Commitment to nature at the UN Biodiversity Summit with 92 other nations. A year later, at the COP26 climate summit, more than 110 countries, including Colombia, signed the Glasgow Leaders Statement on Forest and Land Use, pledging to end and reverse deforestation by 2030 and pledging to strengthen the rights of indigenous communities. On this occasion, Duque promised to transform 30% of the country’s land into protected areas by the end of his administration in the summer of 2022. If the signing of these agreements has certainly sent a positive signal on the ambition and the government’s desire to step up its efforts in the fight against climate change, the data shows that Colombia still has a long way to go to achieve its ambitions. In recent years, the government has presented several sustainable projects to preserve the virgin rainforest, stop deforestation and fight against climate change. One of the main countries investing in these projects – which range from green energy and transport to sustainable livelihoods and climate policy projects – is the UK. To curb the escalating rates of deforestation in the country, the government has even put in place programs to reward farmers with financial incentives to prevent them from cutting down trees. However, the amount of money offered to them is often extremely small and many landowners do not think it is worth giving up their land.

Despite all these efforts, effective law enforcement – a crucial element of environmental reforms – is still lacking in the country, which is plagued by corruption. On several occasions, international organizations have criticized Colombian politicians for allowing environmental crimes to be committed with impunity. Additionally, ranches across the country are protected by authorities who often turn a blind eye to illegal deforestation, as in the case of Chiribiquete National Park. Finally, despite the government’s efforts, legislation is often difficult to apply in remote areas, which makes it more difficult for the authorities to exercise power.

There is no doubt that Colombia needs stronger government action if it is to reverse this destructive trend and fulfill its promise to end deforestation by 2030. With imminent electionsthe country’s best hope for changing the situation is to elect a president with a strong plan to protect the environment, safeguard biodiversity and promote the energy transition.

You might also like: How Colombia’s president is ignoring the climate crisis

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Iwan Dento, “hero” of the karst mountains of South Sulawesi https://nflandtrust.org/iwan-dento-hero-of-the-karst-mountains-of-south-sulawesi/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 15:31:14 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/iwan-dento-hero-of-the-karst-mountains-of-south-sulawesi/ For more than a decade, environmental activist Iwan Dento has opposed the mining of limestone karst formations in his native Maros, Indonesia. Until 2013, the mountainous karst area of ​​Rammang-rammang was mined for marble and limestone, but local resistance led to protective regulations and the creation of an ecotourism area. For his dedication to defending […]]]>
  • For more than a decade, environmental activist Iwan Dento has opposed the mining of limestone karst formations in his native Maros, Indonesia.
  • Until 2013, the mountainous karst area of ​​Rammang-rammang was mined for marble and limestone, but local resistance led to protective regulations and the creation of an ecotourism area.
  • For his dedication to defending the karst and establishing ecotourism, Iwan Dento has been nominated for several environmental conservation awards by government and the private sector, and is considered the “Hero” of Rammang-rammang.

MAROS, Indonesia — Forty-two kilometers, or about 26 miles, north of the bustling port city of Makassar in Indonesia’s South Sulawesi province, rolling karst formations dominate the landscape. Covering an area of ​​approximately 43,000 hectares (106,300 acres), the mountains span two administrative districts, Maros and the Pangkajene (Pangkep) Islands, forming the second largest karst area in the world. Hidden in the limestone are hundreds of caves, many of which contain evidence of a prehistoric civilization dating back over 40,000 years. Several species endemic to Sulawesi, such as the black crested macaque (renowned “selfie monkey”), have also been found in the area.

In the village of Salenrang is Rammang-rammang, a group of karst formations with an inspiring history: once mined for marble and limestone, the area is now protected and home to a grassroots ecotourism initiative. Resident and environmental activist Muhammad Ikhwan, known as Iwan Dento, who led the fight to stop mining activities and establish ecotourism in their place, was recently recognized as a ‘hero’ of Rammang-rammang during of an annual Social Impact Awards ceremony hosted by Indonesia’s First National News TV Channel.

Along with other residents of Salenrang, for more than 10 years, Iwan has fought to defend his homeland against the threat of extractive industries. Before becoming a tourist village, inaugurated by the Indonesian Minister of Tourism in 2021, the region was degraded by limestone and marble quarries. A cement mine was also located nearby.

Iwan Dento receives the Kick Andy Heroes award. Image courtesy of Iwan Dento.

“The biggest challenge actually came from the residents themselves who didn’t really want the mining to stop because they were receiving its economic benefits,” Iwan said. “The company also tried to convince me. If I had wanted to, I could have accepted the greed, which was certainly not an insignificant sum.

Indonesia is no stranger to grassroots movements rising up to defend karst formations from extractive industries.

In 2005, a major cement company announced plans to build factories in the Kendeng Mountains of Central Java, despite local fears that the factories would poison the groundwater basin on which their livelihoods depended. agriculture-based livelihoods. Local women have led years of protests against the factories, and in 2016 those at the heart of the movement captured the nation’s attention by putting their feet in cement outside the presidential palace in Jakarta. In the same year, it was reported that almost 10% of the 155,000 square kilometers (nearly 60,000 square miles) of Indonesian karst formations had been damaged by extractive industries and land conversion.

In 2017, activists called on the government to issue new regulations to better protect Indonesia’s karsts.

Rammang-rammang, located in Maros Regency, South Sulawesi, has become a tourist destination.
Rammang-rammang, located in Maros Regency, South Sulawesi, has become a tourist destination. Previously it was quarried for marble and limestone, but now the area is protected and home to a grassroots ecotourism initiative. Photo by Wahyu Chandra/Mongabay Indonesia.

The end of the mining era

The movement to stop mining activities in Rammang-rammang began in 2009 and ended with the Maros District government revoking various mining permits in the area in 2013. After the end of the mining era, the challenge began for residents to keep mining companies back and find an alternative livelihood.

Ecotourism was chosen because the region was already beginning to attract visitors, mainly researchers and small groups. Other parts of Indonesia threatened by extractive industries also see the same future: the Aru Islands in eastern Indonesia are considering ecotourism as a way to prevent agribusiness from damaging their delicate ecosystem of small islands.

Prioritizing conservation, education and community empowerment, and employing around 200 locals, the Rammang-rammang ecotourism area was launched in 2015. In the first year, it was visited by thousands of travellers. In the same year, the Maros-Pangkep Geopark was established to protect the archaeological, ecological and cultural value of the region. It became a National Geopark in 2017 and is currently being assessed for UNESCO Global Geopark status.

Iwan has helped run the Rammang-rammang tourism business and has also implemented several initiatives such as waste management, river conservation, organic farming and local cuisine development.

Along with other residents of Salenrang, for more than 10 years, Iwan has fought to defend his homeland against the threat of extractive industries.
Along with other residents of Salenrang, for more than 10 years, Iwan has fought to defend his homeland against the threat of extractive industries.

He said that while turning Rammang-rammang into a tourist center was not necessarily the best choice for the region, it was a much better option than mining.

“It’s seen from a regional protection perspective,” he said. “Looking at the current situation, we are quite happy to be able to prove that we can manage this place well through tourism.”

The desire to safeguard the karst formations has also motivated various local groups to fight for legal protection, leading the regional government to issue a protection regulation in 2019. The regulation prohibits excessive exploitation, whether by companies or the community itself, and should have an impact on sustainability. from the tourist area, Iwan said.

“We hope that our current activities will be passed on to future generations,” he said. “We need state recognition because this is an important issue.”

For his dedication to protecting the karst mountains and establishing ecotourism, Iwan was named one of seven “Kick Andy Heroes” by Jakarta-based Metro TV this year. In 2015 he was a finalist in the television channel’s documentary competition, the Eagle Awards, and in 2020 he was nominated for a Kalpataru Award from the Ministry of Environment and Forests.

Iwan Dento as guest speaker at Kick Andy event.
Iwan Dento as guest speaker at Kick Andy event. Image via Kick Andy on Instagram.

A new era of tourism management

Indonesian Tourism Minister Sandiaga Uno inaugurated Salenrang as a “tourist village” in mid-2021, marking a new era of tourism in the region. Indonesia is home to around 1,200 tourist villages, which are developed with the aim of environmental conservation, cultural preservation and economic regeneration, with a strong emphasis on prioritizing local wisdom.

Sandiaga’s inauguration of the Salenrang Tourist Village also strengthened the region’s bid for Maros-Pangkep Geopark to become a UNESCO Global Geopark. If successful, it will become the sixth geopark in Indonesia with UNESCO status and the first in Sulawesi.

Commenting on the inauguration, Iwan wrote on his Facebook page: “Today reminded me of when, more than 10 years ago, this village was almost completely depleted by an authorized mine. And a few chose to stand on the steep rock that rises to the surface. It is love that saves them and love that will take care of them.

Indonesian Minister of Tourism Sandiaga Salahudin Uno and influencer Atta Halilintar took time out for a walk around tourist villages in Rammang-rammang, Maros. Photo by Marcell Lahea for Mongabay Indonesia.

Banner image: Besides playing an active role in building Rammang-rammang as a nature tourism center, Iwan Dento is also active in promoting organic farming. Photo by Wahyu Chandra/Mongabay Indonesia.

This story was first reported by the Indonesian Mongabay team and published here on our indonesian site April 3, 2022.

Activism, Community Conservation, Conservation, Conservation Leadership, Development, Ecotourism, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Government, Karst, Mining, Mountains, Tourism, Travel

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