Land Conversion – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 13:00:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nflandtrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-138x136.png Land Conversion – NFL And Trust http://nflandtrust.org/ 32 32 Latest planning applications submitted to Newark and Sherwood District Council for decision https://nflandtrust.org/latest-planning-applications-submitted-to-newark-and-sherwood-district-council-for-decision/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 12:17:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/latest-planning-applications-submitted-to-newark-and-sherwood-district-council-for-decision/ The following planning applications have been submitted to the Newark and Sherwood District Council: Averham: Revised proposed garden shed, solar panels and oil storage tank for new house, at The Gables, Pinfold Lane, by Lorraine Bailey. Balderton: Garden room, at 80 Main Street, by Mr. and Mrs. B Hawkins. A roundup of this week’s scheduling […]]]>

The following planning applications have been submitted to the Newark and Sherwood District Council:

Averham: Revised proposed garden shed, solar panels and oil storage tank for new house, at The Gables, Pinfold Lane, by Lorraine Bailey.

Balderton: Garden room, at 80 Main Street, by Mr. and Mrs. B Hawkins.

A roundup of this week’s scheduling apps… (8049009)

Balderton: Legal Development Certificate for the existing development of a replacement covered patio at the rear of the property at 73 Stafford Avenue by Silvia Rotari.

Balderton: Residential development comprising 94 homes, including the removal of ten TPO trees (resubmission) at Highfields School, London Road, at Avant Homes (Central) Ltd.

Balderton: Single storey extension to the front elevation, at 13 Coleridge Road, by S Baines.

Bulcote: Conversion of barn to annex and listed building at Ivy House, Old Main Road, by JA Boylan Kemp.

Collingham: Certificate of legality for the proposed insertion of dormer windows in the north and south facing roofs, at Old Hall Cottage, 8 Queen Street, by Anthony Harper.

East Stoke: Change of use of outbuilding to holiday rental, at Holme Farm, Fosse Road, by Mr Doran.

Edwinstowe: Replace flat porch roof with pitched roof and remove decking, at 14 Rufford Road, by David Patterson.

Elston: Tree works, at 4 The Green, by Max Cassidy.

Elston: Front porch, single-storey rear extension and solar panel installation (front and rear) at 13 Pinfold Lane, by Wayne Eason.

Farndon: Pre-approval for demolition of conservatory and erection of rear extension, at 24 Sandhill Road, by Mark Rick.

Fiskerton: Replace bedroom and kitchen windows to match, at Anchor Down, Main Street, by Janet Thompson.

Girton: One-storey extension to west elevation, at West View, Procters Drive, by Sam Annis.

Hoveringham: tree work, at Southfield Lodge, Main Street, by Mrs. Mantle.

Kersall: Temporary location and occupancy of a static mobile caravan of timber-clad farm workers, on land in Wood Lane, by Anna Speir.

Laxton and Moorhouse: Tree Works, at Toad Cottage, Town End, Laxton, by Andrew Wood.

Little Carlton and South Muskham: Internal and External Alterations, at 1 Grange Farm Mews, Old Grange Farm, Main Street, South Muskham, by Mr and Mrs Burnett-Boothroyd.

Newark: Accommodation (revised 19/02099/FUL) at The Cottage, 152 Beacon Hill Road, by Ablehomes Ltd.

Newark: Tree Works, at Zizzi at The Ossington, Beast Market Hill, by Shoby Properties Ltd.

Newark: Community center building to accommodate existing food surplus/social supermarket scheme, following relocation of existing portacabins (re-submission) to Barnby Road Primary and Nursery School, John Gold Avenue, per school.

Oxton: Tree Works, at The Old Vicarage, Main Street, by Jacobs.

South Scarle: Tree works, at Post Office Cottage, Post Office Lane, by Lisa Mears.

South Scarle: Tree Works, at Bramble Cottage, Post Office Lane, by Terry Hewitt.

South Scarle: Conversion of a Dutch barn into a dwelling, at Church Farm, Main Street, by Mr and Mrs Clements.

Southwell: Renovation and extension of dwelling and new garage, at 18 Easthorpe, by Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

Southwell: Tree works, at 26 Nottingham Road, by Cain.

Sutton-on-Trent: Tree works, at 16A High Street, by Anthony Busby.

Thurgarton: Tree wroks, at Thurgarton Priory, Priory Road, by Nick Gadsby.

Thurgarton: tree work, at Corners, Bleasby Road, by Kim Willis.

Thurgarton: Remove the veranda and build a one-storey rear extension and open a carport on the southwest elevation.

Weston: Two storey extension to existing outbuilding (re-submission) at 4 Meadow Lane, by Mr McNally.

Winkburn: Construct underground power cables, substation and associated infrastructure to connect the Winkburn Solar Farm to the grid, with access from Caunton Road, on land in Winkburn Lane, by Lightsource 196 SPV Ltd.

Winthorpe: Tree works, at Winthorpe House, 47 Gainsborough Road, by Sarah Farmer.



]]>
Firm Representing Laurel Creek Trail & Atlantic & Yadkin Greenway Landowners Back for Saluda Grade Trail Case https://nflandtrust.org/firm-representing-laurel-creek-trail-atlantic-yadkin-greenway-landowners-back-for-saluda-grade-trail-case/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 21:29:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/firm-representing-laurel-creek-trail-atlantic-yadkin-greenway-landowners-back-for-saluda-grade-trail-case/ Stewart, Wald and McCulley Educating property owners about their legal rights in regards to their property along a railroad conversion is our number one priority. » —Steven M. Wald TRYON, NORTH CAROLINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Sept. 23, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Stewart, Wald & McCulley, a leading Rails-to-Trails law firm, which has successfully represented landlords […]]]>

Stewart, Wald and McCulley

Educating property owners about their legal rights in regards to their property along a railroad conversion is our number one priority. »

—Steven M. Wald

TRYON, NORTH CAROLINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Sept. 23, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Stewart, Wald & McCulley, a leading Rails-to-Trails law firm, which has successfully represented landlords landowners in cases involving the Laurel Creek Trail and the Atlantic and Yadkin Greenway, are back in the Carolinas.

The firm, touting successes in Greenville, SC and Guilford, NC for rail-to-trail conversion cases, now represents landowners resulting from the conversion of the Saluda Grade Rail Trail. The previous cases involved the Laurel Creek Trail and the Atlantic and Yadkin Greenway, filed in the United States Federal Court of Claims. These cases were called 112 Haywood Rd. v. United States, Case No. 15-1036, Goodwill Industries of Upstate/Midlands SC v. United States, Case No. 18-1248, Fuller v. United States, Case No. 21-1366, Takes v. United States, case no. 21-1365, and Fray v. US, Case No. 19-1636, all of which recovered compensation from the federal government.

In the Saluda Grade Trail, landowners own land along the 31-mile Saluda Grade Rail Corridor from Inman, SC (north of Spartanburg) and continuing through Campobello, Landrum, Tryon and Saluda, before entering North Carolina and reaching Zirconia (south of Hendersonville). This trail would be 16 miles in South Carolina and 15 miles in North Carolina.

Conservation Carolina reports that the Saluda Grade Trail would be created as part of the federal railroad bank program. The Surface Transportation Board (“STB”) is a federal agency that oversees railroads. When railroads under federal jurisdiction express interest in abandoning their lines, a trail group may step in to make an offer to purchase the land and convert the rail corridor to a railroad. The process of converting inactive rail corridors into recreational trails and keeping the corridor intact for future rail use is called “rail banking”.

If the STB allows a conversion of the trails, which the company expects to happen in the short term, it would potentially trigger a claim for damages in favor of the landowners against the United States government. Whether it takes 1 year or 10 years for the design and construction of the trail to take place, Stewart, Wald & McCulley fully intend to represent the landowners for a takeover of their land. Additionally, whether the company is retained by 1 client or 100 clients, Stewart, Wald & McCulley are committed to representing landowners along the proposed Saluda Grade Rail Trail.

The landowners recently attended meetings at the Tryon Country Club hosted by Stewart, Wald & McCulley. The company plans to be back in the area for future meetings, as attorney Steven Wald notes, “educating landowners on their legal rights with respect to their property along a road conversion of iron is our number one priority”. Any lawsuit brought on behalf of a landowner is against the federal government only and does not affect the trail project. Stewart, Wald & McCulley estimates that there are approximately 232 potential claimants who are not yet represented.

Steven M. Wald
Stewart, Wald and McCulley
+1 314-720-0220
wald@swm.legal
Visit us on social media:
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Other

What is Rails-To-Trails litigation?

]]>
Upalokayukta report on wakf properties to be tabled in Legislative Assembly https://nflandtrust.org/upalokayukta-report-on-wakf-properties-to-be-tabled-in-legislative-assembly/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 16:34:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/upalokayukta-report-on-wakf-properties-to-be-tabled-in-legislative-assembly/ Chief Minister Basavaraj Bommai told the Legislative Assembly on Wednesday that Karnataka Upalokayukta’s report on wakf property encroachment will be tabled in the Legislative Assembly. Responding to a notice of appeal by BJP MP Raghupathi Bhat who demanded action based on then-State Minority Commission Chairman Anwar Manippady’s report on wakf property encroachment, the minister chief […]]]>

Chief Minister Basavaraj Bommai told the Legislative Assembly on Wednesday that Karnataka Upalokayukta’s report on wakf property encroachment will be tabled in the Legislative Assembly.

Responding to a notice of appeal by BJP MP Raghupathi Bhat who demanded action based on then-State Minority Commission Chairman Anwar Manippady’s report on wakf property encroachment, the minister chief noted that the Upalokayukta had also looked into the matter. He said the government would take a call on how to proceed with the Upalokayukta report.

Heated debate over the delay

Meanwhile, in the Legislative Council, more than an hour’s work was lost on Wednesday morning when the House witnessed chaos over the government’s delay in placing the Manippady committee’s report on wakf properties, and later by refusal to answer a question posed by the Member, resulting in an adjournment.

Interestingly, ruling BJP members staged vehement protests against the Manippady committee’s report not being tabled even after two years, and members shouted slogans. The loud demand came from the Treasury benches even as members settled into their seats. BJP Chief Whip Mr Narayan Swamy said there was a 2 lakh crore scam in wakf properties even as President Raghunath Rao Malkapure tried to kick off Question Time.

While after much effort the proceedings began, the din returned to the House as soon as Congressman Saleem Ahmed protested after Revenue Minister R. Ashok requested more time to answer a question on land allocation, land conversion, income certificate, pension, birth and death. . A miffed Mr. Ahmed, some of whose questions went unanswered during the session, entered the well in protest and other members of Congress also joined him.

]]>
TVA asks for help to fight against the looters of cultural resources https://nflandtrust.org/tva-asks-for-help-to-fight-against-the-looters-of-cultural-resources/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 14:29:42 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/tva-asks-for-help-to-fight-against-the-looters-of-cultural-resources/ CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Archaeological looting is a serious problem on the Tennessee Valley Authority’s vast landholdings in a seven-state region where about 12,500 archaeological sites have been identified. There may be three times as many sites, according to TVA archaeologists who were on site recently at the Chickamauga Dam for an educational event for […]]]>

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Archaeological looting is a serious problem on the Tennessee Valley Authority’s vast landholdings in a seven-state region where about 12,500 archaeological sites have been identified.

There may be three times as many sites, according to TVA archaeologists who were on site recently at the Chickamauga Dam for an educational event for the public.

TVA’s Cultural Team and TVA Police hosted the event at the Taylor Boat Launch at the Chickamauga Dam Day-Use Area in Chattanooga to raise awareness of the area’s rich history and help people to understand what to do if they see someone taking or damaging cultural heritage. site, according to TVA spokesman Scott Fiedler.

“The looting of cultural resources is a problem in our region,” Fiedler said. “So we want to get the audience involved to say something if they see something.”

Most of the sites are Native American, some belong to early European settlers, and others are tied to more recent human development from 100 or more years ago, according to Mike Angst, an archaeologist in TVA’s Department of Cultural Resources.

“We’re here to talk about the Archaeological Resources Protection Act,” Angst said standing near a table filled with information for members of the public.

TVA officials were telling passersby about the types of archaeological sites that exist, why they are protected under the law, and what the penalties are if someone is caught taking anything on federal land.

Angst said the more than 12,500 sites currently registered represent only a fraction of those that would be on TVA lands in Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Kentucky and Mississippi. .

“There are 12,000 plus years of history and prehistory,” he said. “Most of the sites are Native American, but we also have pioneer sites, Civil War sites through the early and mid-20th century. Technically, any site over 50 years old can be an archaeological site.

The Archaeological Resources Protection Law states that a site must be over 100 years old to fall under the protection of the law, he said.

“Our goal with cultural compliance at TVA is to make sure we can keep as many of these resources where they are for as long as possible,” Angst said. “We don’t want to see them disappear or go into someone’s pocket. We don’t want them stolen. These are everyone’s sites. It’s public property, and it’s everyone’s.

For archaeologists, when someone damages a site, there is no way to restore it, and anything taken is lost along with its historical context, he said.

“Looting is a problem, and it happens everywhere,” Angst said. “Archaeological resources, archaeological sites are a finite resource. Once they’re gone, they’re gone forever. When we do professional excavations, we try to do them with great care because we know that when we dig a site, we destroy it.

He said professional archaeologists try to dig as little as possible so that more material remains in place.

But when someone digs up relics and artifacts from cultural sites and brings them home, the theft is from the general public, Angst said.

TVA Police Inspector Tim Dilbeck said the Archaeological Resources Protection Act is law enforcement’s best tool for protecting sites and prosecuting looters.

“We work hand in hand with cultural conformity. Whenever we have a case, we ask them to perform an archaeological assessment, which is critical to prosecution efforts,” said Dilbeck, alongside Angst, who noted that archaeologists and ISIS forces order form a team.

“The problem is that we have people here – especially when the water is pulled – in the exposed lake beds, they are mostly looking for Native Americans and Civil War (relics), but you also have properties, and if they are over 100 years old, they’re also protected,” Dilbeck said. “They’re digging these sites, they’re digging into the graves. Even here, when they’re not digging, when they’re picking up artifacts on the surface, they’re breaking the law. .

Anyone caught damaging or taking anything from an archaeological site can face a misdemeanor or felony charge, depending on the amount of damage.

A misdemeanor conviction can result in a two-year prison sentence and a $100,000 fine. A crime can result in a five-year prison sentence and up to $250,000 in fines, Dilbeck said. Tougher penalties can be meted out to offenders when burial sites are damaged, he said.

Dilbeck added that anyone who helps cultural resource thieves buy, sell or trade stolen artifacts can also face charges.

Dilbeck said TVA’s most recent cultural resource theft investigation took place in June and came from artifact hunters who dug into Native American burial sites in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Two men face felony charges in the case, he said.

Steven Ward, TVA police inspector and drone pilot, said his role in investigating and locating the site is a recent development in TVA’s investigative arm. Ward was already an airline pilot, so it was only a short step to becoming familiar with flying drones, he said.

The drone used by TVA has high-resolution cameras, can operate up to 5 miles and has a controller that the pilot uses that has a screen providing a first-person view from the drone, Ward said, holding the drone and the rotating to show its characteristics.

The drone can provide thermal imaging, can be hooked up to a big-screen TV and has around 25 minutes of flight time on each of its six batteries, allowing for near-constant use, he said.

Ward can use the drone to search for people who have gotten lost, assist with investigations at cultural sites and search for looters almost silently from the sky, he said.

From a TVA police boat with Inspectors Jimmy Nelson and Roy Rogers at the helm, TVA archaeologist Paul Avery said the way water in TVA reservoirs is eroding the shoreline – at a much higher level than the original channel – may reveal artifacts and relics.

“You have to think about how the river system has changed with the floods. The river channel was here,” he said, sweeping his hand over the middle of Lake Chickamauga. “What we’re sitting on right now was a floodplain, so it’s great land to live in when you think about the past.”

The lakeshores of TVA Reservoir are where looters are most likely to be due to further erosion along the new shoreline created by the damming of the river more than 80 years ago, Avery said. Chickamauga Dam was completed in 1940.

“When these guys are patrolling the water, they’re looking for these guys along the shoreline,” he said of the TVA police patrols.

Avery said many cultural resource thieves convert their finds into cash for drugs.

“I saw these guys arrest very few people on the shore who had nothing in their pocket,” he said. “A lot of them have a source that they know where they can sell the products. That’s where you really run into the almost industrial scale looting.

Looters will happily loot burial sites, a particularly worrying violation, he said.

“My analogy for this is, how would you like me to go dig up your grandma for her wedding ring? That’s what you just did,” Avery said of his words for the looters. “And Native Americans view kinship differently than we do. “Grandma” has a much broader interpretation for them. »

Avery said it’s important for people to understand that once they’ve damaged a site, nothing can restore it. Once they’ve taken something, they can’t put it into context. This is why cultural resources are protected by law on federal lands, he said.

“It’s part of our mission to try to protect it,” he said.

]]>
Expect! Do not sell this land/house yet due to moving. You can do them…… By DENNIS ISONG https://nflandtrust.org/expect-do-not-sell-this-land-house-yet-due-to-moving-you-can-do-them-by-dennis-isong/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 06:06:21 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/expect-do-not-sell-this-land-house-yet-due-to-moving-you-can-do-them-by-dennis-isong/ Dennis Isong helps individuals invest directly in real estate There is so much excitement in leaving a country like Nigeria. Some of the reasons for this are that people finally feel freed from difficulties, insecurities, etc. which have deeply eroded the country. It is common for people to want to sell their properties for various […]]]>
Dennis Isong helps individuals invest directly in real estate

There is so much excitement in leaving a country like Nigeria. Some of the reasons for this are that people finally feel freed from difficulties, insecurities, etc. which have deeply eroded the country.

It is common for people to want to sell their properties for various reasons. Some do it as a way to get more money to travel, while others do it because they feel they no longer need the property since they no longer intend to return to Nigeria.

When Mr. Phillip and his family wanted to move, there were two houses available that they owned.

He was determined to sell them, but his wife advised against it. She thought that since her husband had someone they trusted who could be in charge, they should hire them instead and still get their payback in absentia. Mr. Phillip disagreed. He no longer cared about the country or all it had to offer.

It’s understandable. Many people would prefer to get rid of anything that might stress them out once they get out of Nigeria.

So he sold them and they all left.

The first months were quite difficult for them because Mr. Phillip could not find a job in time, which was not expected. The bills were on his wife and she choked at one point. Then he thought about the houses he sold. If he’d maintained and rented at least one of them, something, even if it wasn’t much, would pay off.

As I said earlier, when people decide to leave all kinds of luggage in Nigeria, we cannot blame them. However, we need to see beyond the immediate excitement and better understand how our steps may or may not benefit us.

So what should you do instead of selling your properties?

If You’re Not Selling Because You’re Desperately Needing Money, Then You Should Read This…

  1. Rent this property

This should be taken into consideration. There are a lot of overseas owners, so it’s not a bad idea. I advise you to pay the rent monthly. In addition to this, it benefits you because your account will be continuously credited by tenants monthly, it also helps your tenants. The monthly payment is a relief for most people as they can easily take it out of their salary if they are salaried rather than paying all at once before their rent expires. So it’s a win-win.
You may not be in Nigeria but your property is still making money for you and that is the most important thing.

  1. rent it

For people who wish to use the property for various purposes such as a school, church, offices, etc., you will be doing yourself a favor by renting it to them. Of course, it’s a contract with an agreement. You could do it for a few years and it assures you that you have an income from Nigeria and apart from that if you decide to come back to Nigeria you will find the property untouched.

  1. Convert property

I don’t think there is anything wrong with having a business here and living abroad. Many people might feel discouraged, but it’s worth a try. You could convert the property into a mini-mall, bookstore or studio. Since you won’t be there, here’s what you should do: get in touch with someone who needs the space and has the skills and experience to run the business.

Equip or stock the venue, then agree on a percentage you should expect. For Nigerians, the person is the owner, while they just replace you in the form of a partnership.

That’s what we call sleeping while your money works for you.

  1. Make it a home for tourists

Just like a short-term rental apartment, you can make it a resting place for tourists. However, it works if there are sights in that city. Also, it makes your property in the form of a mini-hotel.

However, you cannot do this without having certain things in place before you travel. And if the expenses are overwhelming for you, find an investor who might be interested in the business.

  1. Make it an event center

It largely depends on the size of the property. But for simple events such as seminars, workshops, low-key weddings, etc., your property can fit in. It’s just that you need a representative and staff to help you manage it in your absence.

In conclusion, your property can still earn you money. Don’t be in a rush to sell it. I know a bigger challenge might be finding a man you can trust to come forward honestly. However, I believe you know a lot of people and among them there should be at least one good person to do the job.

Dennis Isong helps individuals invest directly in real estate. For questions about this article or for questions about real estate. Follow him on Youtube https://www.youtube.com/landpropertyng , Email Dennis@Landproperty.ng or Whatsapp/Call +2348164741041

]]>
The Philippines’ most sophisticated airport gets its outlines https://nflandtrust.org/the-philippines-most-sophisticated-airport-gets-its-outlines/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 15:40:56 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/the-philippines-most-sophisticated-airport-gets-its-outlines/ The construction of the new Manila International Airport (MIA), the largest project in the history of Boskalis, has reached an important milestone: the contours of the new land are now visible. Under this massive scheme, approximately 1,700 hectares of land will be developed for the new facilities, located approximately 20 kilometers north of the heart […]]]>

The construction of the new Manila International Airport (MIA), the largest project in the history of Boskalis, has reached an important milestone: the contours of the new land are now visible.

Under this massive scheme, approximately 1,700 hectares of land will be developed for the new facilities, located approximately 20 kilometers north of the heart of Metro Manila in the province of Bulacan.

Photo Boskalis

Land development for the new Manila International Airport is progressing with the largest hoppers in the fleet, fully utilized in the first half.

“In addition to the long-term deployment of our large dredges, this project also provides a significant amount of local employment,” said CEO of Boskalis, Peter Berdowski.

Violation Photo

At the start of 2022, the jumbo carrier dredger Prins der Nederlanden was temporarily decommissioned for expansion at a yard in Singapore.

The conversion has since been completed and the vessel was recommissioned in the third quarter with an increased hopper capacity of approximately 22,000 cubic metres.

Also, preparations for the extension of her sister ship Orange are underway and this operation should take place later this year, Boskalis said.

Violation Photo

This capital project is expected to be completed by the end of 2024.

]]>
Virtual Public Meeting to Discuss Bomber Spur Trail Vision – Welcome to the City of Fort Worth https://nflandtrust.org/virtual-public-meeting-to-discuss-bomber-spur-trail-vision-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 15:51:14 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/virtual-public-meeting-to-discuss-bomber-spur-trail-vision-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Posted on September 05, 2022 In 1941, Air Force Plant No. 4 was built on the west side of Fort Worth. The plant manufactured B-24 Liberators and is now the site of Lockheed Martin’s factory. The government contracted the Texas & Pacific Railroad to build the Bomber Spur from its mainline about five miles south […]]]>

Posted on September 05, 2022

In 1941, Air Force Plant No. 4 was built on the west side of Fort Worth. The plant manufactured B-24 Liberators and is now the site of Lockheed Martin’s factory. The government contracted the Texas & Pacific Railroad to build the Bomber Spur from its mainline about five miles south of the factory. During World War II, materials were shipped to the bomber factory via the Bomber Spur.

Today, the abandoned railway line is a prime candidate for a rail-to-trail conversion. It has been identified as part of the Regional Veloweb, a network of 1,728 miles of existing and planned off-street trails for shared use for cyclists, pedestrians, and other forms of non-motorized active transportation in Dallas-Fort Worth.

Representatives from several municipalities and partners have formed a coalition to advocate for the conversion of Bomber Spur into a dedicated off-road bicycle and pedestrian path. The project will improve the region’s alternative transportation, health, safety and environmental initiatives, and increase the quality of life for residents by connecting neighborhoods, parks, educational centers, shopping and major employment centers .

Attend a virtual town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 14 to provide input into the Bomber Spur Trail vision plan. The meeting will take place via Webex. The meeting number is 2553 050 0135; the password is HxMAkE3g2Y8. The phone number is 469-210-7159.

Streams & Valleys, in partnership with the Trust for Public Land and Kimley-Horn, is leading the development of Bomber Spur’s vision plan which shows amenities, seating, signage and landscaping options at each starting point of the trail and articulates opportunities for rest areas, bridges and public art.

For more information, contact Jing Yang to the Fort Worth Parks and Recreation Department at 817-392-5742.

Get articles like this delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to municipal news.

]]>
Overview of South Somerset planning applications https://nflandtrust.org/overview-of-south-somerset-planning-applications/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/overview-of-south-somerset-planning-applications/ BELOW are planning applications received by South Somerset District Council in the week of August 22, 2022. Dozens of requests have been received by the council, including conversions of two-storey outbuildings and the construction of a permanent dwelling for farm workers. For more details and to comment on applications, log on to southsomerset.gov.uk/services/planning. BRUTON 22/02434/DOC1: […]]]>

BELOW are planning applications received by South Somerset District Council in the week of August 22, 2022.

Dozens of requests have been received by the council, including conversions of two-storey outbuildings and the construction of a permanent dwelling for farm workers.

For more details and to comment on applications, log on to southsomerset.gov.uk/services/planning.

BRUTON 22/02434/DOC1: Execution of conditions #4 (Natural England License), #5 (Bat Box), #6 (Bat Loft Provision), #7 (lighting) and #8 (bird nesting) of the planning application 21/02572 /FUL. Pavilion House Dropping Lane Bruton Somerset BA10 0NL.

CHÂTEAU CARY 22/02422/TCA: Notification of Intent to Perform Tree Surgery Work at Tree #1 in a Conservation Area. Wason House Upper High Street Castle Cary Somerset BA7 7AT.

22/02423/TCA: Notification of intent to cut down trees No. 2 in a conservation area. Lodge View Florida Street Castle Cary Somerset BA7 7AE.

CHARD 22/02205/LBC: Conversion of a two-storey outbuilding into a residential annex. Modifications to the one-storey outbuilding to replace the roof and modify the fenestration. Forden Wadeford Hill Wadeford Chard Somerset TA20 3AU.

22/02204/HOU: Conversion of a two-storey outbuilding into a residential annex. Modifications to the one-storey outbuilding to replace the roof and modify the fenestration. Forden Wadeford Hill Wadeford Chard Somerset TA20 3AU.

ILMINSTER 22/02447/TCA: Notification of intention to fell tree n°1 in a conservation area. Keepers Mill Lane Dowlish Wake Ilminster Somerset TA19 0NY.

22/02440/DOC1: Discharge of condition n°3 (colour) for the planning request 21/01583/LBC. 25 Station Road Ilminster Somerset TA19 9BE.

MARTOCK 22/02428/PDE: Proposed single-storey rear extension (i) the projection of the rear extension beyond the rear wall is 6.50 m (ii) the maximum height of the extension is 3.5 (iii) the height at the eaves of the extension is 2.15. Rannerdale Folly Road Kingsbury Episcopi Martock Somerset TA12 6BH.

22/02400/PAMB: Notification of Prior Approval for a Proposal to Convert Existing Farm Barns No 2 to Accommodation No 5. Foldhill Farm Foldhill Lane Martock Somerset TA12 6PQ.

22/02424/TPO: Application to Fell No. 1 Tree as advised with South Somerset District Council (MART 1) 2015 Tree Preservation Order. Orchard View Stapleton Road Martock Somerset TA12 6AN.

MILBONE PORT 22/02418/TPO: Application to perform tree surgery work on Tree No. 1 as directed with Yeovil District Council Tree Preservation Ordinance (1975). Gable Barn London Road Milborne Port Somerset DT9 5DP.

SOMERTON 22/02407/DOC1: Fulfillment of condition no. 3 (drainage), no. 8 (CMP) and no. 19 (work program in accordance with a written survey plan-POW) for planning application 21/03442/S73. Home Land Farm Compton Street Compton Dundon Somerton Somerset TA11 6PT.

22/02432/TCA: Notification of intent to cut down trees No. 3 in a conservation area. Kingweston House, Millfield School North Park Kingweston Somerton Somerset TA11 6AZ.

STOKE SUB HAMDON 22/02426/TCA: Notification of intention to fell tree no. 1 in a conservation area. Pennview Fair Place Chiselborough Stoke Sub Hamdon Somerset TA14 6TL.

22/02420/DOC1: Discharge of condition n°3 (materials) for planning permit 20/01622/FUL. Rear land of Suntreat Montacute Road East Stoke Stoke Sub Hamdon Somerset TA14 6UQ.

PETHERTON SOUTH 22/02425/TCA: Notification of intention to fell tree no. 1 in a conservation area. Lightgate Farm 7 Roundwell Street South Petherton Somerset TA13 5AA.

TAUNTON 22/02459/DOC1: Discharge of condition n°5 (lighting) and n°6 (BMEP) for the planning request 21/03844/S73A. Land OS 6790 Lower Swell Fivehead Taunton Somerset.

TEMPLECOMBE 22/02254/FUL: Construction of a polytunnel for agricultural use. Ground Os 1576 Temple Lane Templecombe Somerset.

YEOVIL 22/02444/PAMB: Notification of pre-approval for a project to convert an agricultural building into a 4-bedroom dwelling. Chestnut Farm Upper Spine Farm Lane North Barrow Yeovil Somerset BA7 7NT.

22/02446/P3MA: Pre-approval for proposed change of use from commercial, business and service use (Class E) to residential house (Class C3), to convert offices to 4 bedroom apartments rooms n°1. 6A – 6B Middle Street Yeovil Somerset BA20 1LZ.

22/02429/PDE: Removal of existing reserves at the rear and proposal for rear extension (i) the projection of the rear extension beyond the rear wall is 4.50m (ii) the maximum height of the extension is 3.05m (iii) the height to the eaves of the extension is 2.75m. 9 Westland Road Yeovil Somerset BA20 2AS.

22/02403/PAMB: Notice of Prior Approval for a proposed change of use of Farm Building to Dwelling House No 1. Pitfield Corner Pitfield Corner Farm Rimpton Yeovil Somerset.

22/02397/NMA: Non-material modification of Approved Application 05/01662/FUL to modified design of project verandah element. Holly Tree Cottage Moor Lane Hardington Mandeville Yeovil Somerset BA22 9NW.

]]>
The American Scholar: The Convert’s Zeal https://nflandtrust.org/the-american-scholar-the-converts-zeal/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 06:16:08 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/the-american-scholar-the-converts-zeal/
Simona Cerrato/Flickr

Simona Cerrato/Flickr

The prophet of the Andes: an unlikely journey to the promised land by Graciela Mochkofsky (translated from Spanish by Lisa Dillman); Knopf, 288 pages, $30

Most people think of scripture as a noun, but it’s actually a verb. In other words, Scripture is an event, a relational activity. This is what happens when people read or hear a text and they transcend themselves. Like mercury releasing gold from the ore, the scriptures release something pure from people, compelling them to change their way of life. Nothing illustrates what I mean better than the story of Segundo Villanueva, a poor Peruvian who, in 1948, when he was 21, found a copy of the Bible in a trunk inherited from his father.

Bibles were rare in Peruvian Catholic homes. You attended mass to hear the Bible; you haven’t read it. And what you heard was incomprehensible Latin. But Villanueva’s copy was in Spanish, he read it, and he was as inspired as he was perplexed. God was speaking to him directly, showing him the right way to live, but the Bible also contradicted Catholic doctrine and practice. So Villanueva embarked on a spiritual quest to live by God’s law, eventually converting to Judaism and leading a community of converted Peruvian Jews to Israel. Argentinian journalist Graciela Mochkofsky tells the singular story of Villanueva in The Prophet of the Andes.

For 15 years, Mochkofsky absorbed Villanueva’s labyrinthine journey from the Andes to the Holy Land, speaking with family, friends and associates on multiple continents. She writes with an inviting tone and easy pace that reflects Villanueva’s spirit of open curiosity and clear thinking. His work is commendable, and Villanueva deserves a biography: he is a modern mix of the biblical figures Zerubbabel, who brought the exiled Israelites back from Babylon to Jerusalem, and Ezra, who read the Torah to them so that they could once again obey the commandments of God. Yet Villanueva’s actions are so sensible that you’d think her story would be common. Any informed reader can see the same incongruities as him. For example, the God of the Bible requires us to keep the Sabbath on the seventh day, but the priests told Villanueva that “it was a mortal sin not to go to church on Sunday.” God forbids the worship of idols and graven images, but as Mochkofsky asks: “What were the images of saints, the statues of the Virgin and the Lord of Miracles used in processions, if not idols?” God forbids eating unclean animals, yet pork was a staple in the Villanueva community. Then there was circumcision, which God requires of his male followers. So why weren’t Catholics circumcised?

As Villanueva read further, moving from “the first part” of the Bible to “the second part”, he noticed that “the tone was particularly different”, that the Gospels were full of inconsistencies, contradicting and contradicting each other and “sometimes defied common sense. Paul’s epistles were particularly dubious, as Paul asserted that there was no longer any obligation to follow the law of Moses – that circumcision was of the heart, not of the foreskin. But if the law of Moses was eternal, Villanueva wondered, how could it expire? So, who should we trust: the friend of God Moses or this guy Paul?

Disillusioned with the Catholic Church, Villanueva posed his questions to various Protestant clerics. After joining the Seventh-day Adventist Reform Movement, because its adherents observed at least the Sabbath on the proper day, he founded his own community – Israel of God – and in 1967 temporarily settled in the Amazon jungle, far hostile neighbors.

There Villanueva studied various versions of the Bible, but he became concerned that errors might have crept into the translations. He resolved to learn Hebrew, which led him to the small Jewish community in Lima. Soon Villanueva concluded that Jesus was not the Messiah because, as everyone could see, the predictions of the prophets did not come true after Jesus died – wolves, for example, did not live with the lambs. So Villanueva literally ripped “the false Christian part” out of her Bibles and concluded that her community needed to convert to Judaism.

Although the rabbi of the Lima synagogue answered Villanueva’s questions, he refused to convert Peruvians. Considered upper class by national taxonomies, the Sephardic Jews of Peru did not want to mingle with the mestizos of the provinces. Undeterred, Villanueva relied on other books: Jewish traditions and customs then the Shulchan Aruch, from which the Israel of God community learned to pray, light Shabbat candles, make challah, observe festivals, and generally live like the Jewish people. Yet, for that to really happen, Villanueva decided they had to move to the Holy Land. So he changed the group’s name to Bnei Moshe – Children of Moses – and eventually persuaded the Israeli Chief Rabbinate to officially convert them to Judaism and support their emigration to Israel. In 1990, 42 years after Villanueva discovered his Bible, the Bnei Moshes were placed in a controversial settlement in the West Bank, where they were known as Peruanim.

But like a naïve American Buddhist who discovers that most Buddhists in Asia drink alcohol, eat meat and don’t meditate, Villanueva was disappointed to learn that only about 20 percent of Israeli Jews were Orthodox. The Peruanim had to decide which Orthodox sect they would belong to. But Villanueva, who took the Hebrew name Zerubbabel Tzidkiya, rejected the Talmud and the authority of rabbis of all sects, wanting to follow only the Word of God as found in the Torah. He even discarded the rest of the Tanakh, all the books of the Prophets and the Writings that were added during the Babylonian captivity. As a result, Villanueva was shunned by Israelis as well as Peruvian converts, who were then mistakenly called “Inca Jews”.

Abandoned by all but his immediate family, Villanueva died aged 80 in 2008. His grave on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem indicates that he was a “descendant of the conversos of Portugal who returned to his origins”. Today, many Latin Americans find that they are descended from these converse, the Iberian “crypto-Jews” who converted to Catholicism to escape the persecutions of the Inquisition. My Venezuelan wife, for example, was raised Catholic but assumes she has Jewish ancestry because her grandparents spoke Ladino – a mixture of Spanish and Hebrew – and on Friday nights they lit candles and were cooking challah. Yet Segundo Villanueva never claimed his Jewish roots. He simply took the Bible seriously and acted on it. I am truly surprised that millions of other believers have not done the same.

Permission required for reprint, reproduction or other uses.

]]>
Solar on American canals is getting closer to reality – pv magazine International https://nflandtrust.org/solar-on-american-canals-is-getting-closer-to-reality-pv-magazine-international/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 06:15:45 +0000 https://nflandtrust.org/solar-on-american-canals-is-getting-closer-to-reality-pv-magazine-international/ Project Nexus plans to inaugurate a canal-top solar project in the fall, with completion expected by the end of 2023. August 30, 2022 Anne Fisher From pv magazine USA In February, photo magazine reported on Project Nexus, which planned to install solar panels on California’s canals. Now that this project is about to go ahead, […]]]>

Project Nexus plans to inaugurate a canal-top solar project in the fall, with completion expected by the end of 2023.

From pv magazine USA

In February, photo magazine reported on Project Nexus, which planned to install solar panels on California’s canals. Now that this project is about to go ahead, the inauguration is scheduled for the fall.

The Turlock Irrigation District (TID) is in partnership with the Department of Water Resource (DWR), Solar AquaGrid and the University of California, Merced in the project funded by the State of California. The project will include energy storage to investigate how storage facilities can support the local power grid when solar generation is reduced due to cloud cover.

The concept of solar power on California canals grew out of a 2021 study conducted at the University of California, Merced and the University of Santa Cruz, which showed that covering the roughly 4,000 miles of infrastructure California’s public water system with solar panels can generate 13 GW of power per year, about one-sixth of the state’s current installed capacity and about half of the projected new capacity needed to reach the state goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2030.

“Solar canals are an example of an energy-water nexus that offers multiple sustainability benefits. Using water channels for solar infrastructure conserves water while generating renewable electricity and avoids converting large tracts of land to solar development,” said Dr. Brandi L. McKuin, l lead author of the study.

The study suggests that 63 billion gallons of water could be saved each year by lining the canals, which is enough to irrigate 50,000 acres of farmland or meet the water needs of more than 2 million residents. The project will show how channel capping reduces evaporation, potentially improving water quality and reducing vegetative growth.

“Research and common sense tell us that at a time of intensifying drought, it’s time to put the brakes on evaporation,” said Jordan Harris, CEO of Solar AquaGrid. “Our initial study found that mounting solar panels on open channels can result in significant water, energy, and cost savings over ground-mounted solar systems, including increased efficiency resulting from a shading effect/exponential cooling Now is the time to put this learning to the test.

In addition to studying energy production on the canals as well as benefits to water levels and quality, the project offers the opportunity to study a variety of solar panels and inverters to see how they work when installed above or near water. Various forms of energy storage will also be investigated.

The Nexus project is expected to be completed in 2024 at multiple locations within the TID service territory.

This content is copyrighted and may not be reused. If you wish to cooperate with us and wish to reuse some of our content, please contact: editors@pv-magazine.com.

]]>